Effect of α-ketoglutarate infusions on organ balances of glutamine and glutamate in anaesthetized dogs in the catabolic state

E. Roth, J. Karner, A. Roth-Merten, S. Winkler, L. Valentini, K. Schaupp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. The salt complex of L-(+)-ornithine and α-ketoglutarate (2-oxoglutarate) has recently been proposed for the treatment of patients in the catabolic state. As yet, it is unclear which of the two substrates (ornithine or α-ketoglutarate) is responsible for the anticatabolic effect. We infused α-ketoglutarate into anaesthetized postoperative dogs in order to investigate whether infusion of α-ketoglutarate affects the flux of glutamine and glutamate between skeletal muscle and the splanchnic bed. We used three infusion rates: 3, 10 and 20 μmol min-1 kg-1. A steady state of α-ketoglutarate concentration in arterial whole-blood was attained only when the infusion rate was 3 μmol min-1 kg-1. 2. Arterial whole-blood concentrations of α-ketoglutarate were 8.8 ± 1.2 μmol/l in the basal period and rose to 208 ± 41, 344 ± 61 and 1418 ± 315 μmol/l after 60 min infusions of α-ketoglutarate at 3, 10 and 20 μmol min-1 kg-1, respectively. 3. α-Ketoglutarate uptake was measured in skeletal muscle, liver, gut and kidneys in the basal period and during the infusion of α-ketoglutarate. The net uptake of infused α-ketoglutarate was highest in the skeletal muscle, followed by kidneys, liver and gut. 4. The α-ketoglutarate load increased the muscular tissue content of α-ketoglutarate from 49.5 ± 5 to 142 ± 15 nmol/g of dry substance (P <0.001), but did not alter the muscular glutamate or glutamine contents. 5. Infusion of α-ketoglutarate had no effect on the plasma glutamine concentration, nor on the glutamine and glutamate balances across the skeletal muscle, liver and gut. However, α-ketoglutarate infusion significantly reduced the renal extraction of glutamine (P <0.05) and enhanced the renal production of glutamate (P <0.05). 6. We conclude that an intravenous α-ketoglutarate load affects the renal balances of glutamine and glutamate, but does not alter the nitrogen flux of glutamine and glutamate between skeletal muscle, liver and gut.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)625-631
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Science
Volume80
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Glutamine
Glutamic Acid
Dogs
Skeletal Muscle
Kidney
Liver
Viscera
Substance P
Nitrogen
Salts
ornithine alpha-ketoglutarate

Keywords

  • α-ketoglutarate
  • Catabolism
  • Glutamate
  • Glutamine
  • Organ-specific amino acid metabolism
  • Ornicetil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effect of α-ketoglutarate infusions on organ balances of glutamine and glutamate in anaesthetized dogs in the catabolic state. / Roth, E.; Karner, J.; Roth-Merten, A.; Winkler, S.; Valentini, L.; Schaupp, K.

In: Clinical Science, Vol. 80, No. 6, 1991, p. 625-631.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roth, E, Karner, J, Roth-Merten, A, Winkler, S, Valentini, L & Schaupp, K 1991, 'Effect of α-ketoglutarate infusions on organ balances of glutamine and glutamate in anaesthetized dogs in the catabolic state', Clinical Science, vol. 80, no. 6, pp. 625-631.
Roth, E. ; Karner, J. ; Roth-Merten, A. ; Winkler, S. ; Valentini, L. ; Schaupp, K. / Effect of α-ketoglutarate infusions on organ balances of glutamine and glutamate in anaesthetized dogs in the catabolic state. In: Clinical Science. 1991 ; Vol. 80, No. 6. pp. 625-631.
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AU - Schaupp, K.

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