Korai jejunális táplálás akut pancreatitisben: a szeptikus szövódmények és a sokszervi elégtelenség megelózésének lehetósége?

Translated title of the contribution: Early jejunal feeding in acute pancreatitis: prevention of septic complications and multiorgan failure

A. Oláh, G. Pardavi, T. Belágyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Authors evaluate the effect of early jejunal feeding on septic complications and mortality in acute pancreatitis, based on the results of a two-phase, prospective, randomized study. In the first part of the study they compared the conventional parenteral nutrition with early (started within 24 hours) enteral nutrition in a prospective, randomized trial on 89 patients. Forty-eight patients were randomized into the parenteral group "A" (Rindex 10, Infusamin S, Intralipid 10%: 30 kcal/kg) and 41 patients into the enteral group "B" (fed by nasogastric jejunal tube Survimed OPD, 30 kcal/kg). The rate of septic complications (infected necrosis, abscess, infected pseudocyst) were significantly lower in the enteral group (p = 0.08 chi-square test). In the second phase of the study early jejunal feeding was combined with imipenem prophylaxis (Tienam, 2 x 500 mg i.v.) in the necrotizing cases detected by CT scan. According to the results of 92 patients the rate of septic complications (p = 0.03), multiple organ failure (p = 0.14), and mortality (p = 0.13) were further reduced in this group. Authors believe that combination of early enteral nutrition and a selective, adequate antibiotic therapy may give a chance for prevention of multiple organ failure.

Translated title of the contributionEarly jejunal feeding in acute pancreatitis: prevention of septic complications and multiorgan failure
Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)7-12
Number of pages6
JournalMagyar sebészet
Volume53
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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