Dynamics of creatine kinase shuttle enzymes in the human heart

C. Sylven, L. Lin, A. Kallner, P. Sótónyi, E. Somogyi, E. Jansson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Myocardial cytoplasmic creatine kinase subunits M and B, mitochondrial CK (CKMIT), and citrate synthase (CS) were determined in 10 locations of the normal human heart (n = 8) and in papillary muscles of patients operated on for mitral regurgitation (n = 6). Compared to atrial biopsies, septal and left ventricular biopsies showed higher activities for CS (P <0.0001), total CK (P <0.05) and CKMIT (P <0.0001). CKM was evenly distributed. CKB activity in the right septum and left ventricular locations were 0.5-1% of total CK and 4-5 times lower than those of the atria and the right ventricular free wall. Activities of CS, CKB and CKMIT in right septal biopsies did not differ from those in left ventricular locations. The activities of CS, total CK, and CKM in papillary muscle from patients operated on for mitral regurgitation did not differ from that of healthy papillary muscle. CKMIT was about 40% lower (P <0.02), whereas CKB was 15-20 times higher (P <0.0001) than in the healthy heart. In conclusion, adaptations within the creatine kinase system occur in the human heart in health and disease. Small amounts of CKB in the normal left ventricle, as opposed to the right ventricular free wall, might be related to differences in myocardial perfusion during the cardiac cycle. In disease, a decreased CKMIT and dramatically increased CKB may indicate a stressed intracellular energy transfer. CK enzyme activities in right septal biopsy specimens may be used as an indication of metabolic stress on the myocardium of the left ventricle. Acute myocardial infarction in patients with a healthy heart might not give rise to increased serum CKMB levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)350-354
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Investigation
Volume21
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Citrate (si)-Synthase
Biopsy
Creatine Kinase
Papillary Muscles
Muscle
Mitral Valve Insufficiency
Enzymes
Heart Ventricles
MB Form Creatine Kinase
Ventricular Septum
Physiological Stress
Energy Transfer
Enzyme activity
Heart Atria
Energy transfer
Myocardium
Perfusion
Myocardial Infarction
Health
Serum

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Atrium
  • Creatine kinase isoenzymes
  • Disease
  • Health
  • Left ventricle
  • Myocardium
  • Papillary muscle
  • Right ventricle
  • Septum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sylven, C., Lin, L., Kallner, A., Sótónyi, P., Somogyi, E., & Jansson, E. (1991). Dynamics of creatine kinase shuttle enzymes in the human heart. European Journal of Clinical Investigation, 21(3), 350-354.

Dynamics of creatine kinase shuttle enzymes in the human heart. / Sylven, C.; Lin, L.; Kallner, A.; Sótónyi, P.; Somogyi, E.; Jansson, E.

In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 21, No. 3, 1991, p. 350-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sylven, C, Lin, L, Kallner, A, Sótónyi, P, Somogyi, E & Jansson, E 1991, 'Dynamics of creatine kinase shuttle enzymes in the human heart', European Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 350-354.
Sylven, C. ; Lin, L. ; Kallner, A. ; Sótónyi, P. ; Somogyi, E. ; Jansson, E. / Dynamics of creatine kinase shuttle enzymes in the human heart. In: European Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1991 ; Vol. 21, No. 3. pp. 350-354.
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