Dynamics in the effects of the species–area relationship versus local environmental factors in bomb crater ponds

Eszter Krasznai-K, Pál Boda, G. Borics, Balázs A. Lukács, Gábor Várbíró

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The species–area relationship (SAR) is a well-investigated subject raising questions nonetheless. We hypothesized that SAR can be modified by naturally extreme conditions (high pH, conductivity, and total phosphorus) in a small spatial scale. A bombing range was chosen as a sampling location with a densely scattered cluster of bomb crater ponds, which vary in size and in extremity to study the hypothesis. Macroinvertebrate communities from 25 bomb crater ponds were sampled, along with the macrophyte community, while pH, conductivity, total phosphorus, and area were also registered. A decision tree was used to separate extreme from normal ponds based on their chemical characteristics. SAR was found to be the dominant driving force, increasing species richness in the extreme ponds. However, in the normal ponds, the small island effect was observed. The macroinvertebrate communities and macrophyte community types are congruent in normal ponds. Our findings imply that rules in ecology cannot be handled rigidly and there are dynamics existing between the factors that influence the composition of a macroinvertebrate community that cannot be ignored at habitat restorations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalHydrobiologia
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jul 4 2018

Fingerprint

crater
environmental factor
pond
environmental factors
macroinvertebrates
macroinvertebrate
macrophyte
conductivity
phosphorus
habitat restoration
habitat conservation
effect
species richness
ecology
species diversity
sampling

Keywords

  • Habitat diversity
  • Macroinvertebrates
  • Naturally extreme environment
  • Ponds
  • Species accumulation curves

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Dynamics in the effects of the species–area relationship versus local environmental factors in bomb crater ponds. / Krasznai-K, Eszter; Boda, Pál; Borics, G.; Lukács, Balázs A.; Várbíró, Gábor.

In: Hydrobiologia, 04.07.2018, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krasznai-K, Eszter ; Boda, Pál ; Borics, G. ; Lukács, Balázs A. ; Várbíró, Gábor. / Dynamics in the effects of the species–area relationship versus local environmental factors in bomb crater ponds. In: Hydrobiologia. 2018 ; pp. 1-12.
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