Dynamic imaging of cell, extracellular matrix, and tissue movements during avian vertebral axis patterning

Michael B. Filla, A. Czirók, Evan A. Zamir, Charles D. Little, Tracey J. Cheuvront, Brenda J. Rongish

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vertebrate axis patterning depends on cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) repositioning and proper cell-ECM interactions. However, there are few in vivo data addressing how large-scale tissue deformations are coordinated with the motion of local cell ensembles or the displacement of ECM constituents. Combining the methods of dynamic imaging and experimental biology allows both cell and ECM fate-mapping to be correlated with ongoing tissue deformations. These fate-mapping studies suggest that the axial ECM components "move" both as a composite meshwork and as autonomous particles, depending on the length scale being examined. Cells are also part of this composite, and subject to passive displacements resulting from tissue deformations. However, in contrast to the ECM, cells are self-propelled. The net result of cell and ECM displacements, along with proper ECM-cell adhesion, is the assembly of new tissue architecture. Data herein show that disruption of normal cell-ECM interactions during axis formation results in developmental abnormalities and a disorganization of the ECM. Our goal in characterizing the global displacement patterns of axial cells and ECM is to provide critical information regarding existing strain fields in the segmental plate and paraxial mesoderm. Deducing the mechanical influences on cell behavior is critical, if we are to understand vertebral axis patterning. Supplementary material for this article is available online at http://www.mrw.interscience.wiley.com/suppmat/ 1542-975X/suppmat/72/v72.266.html.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-276
Number of pages10
JournalBirth Defects Research Part C - Embryo Today: Reviews
Volume72
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2004

Fingerprint

Extracellular Matrix
Mesoderm
Cell Adhesion
Vertebrates

Keywords

  • Fibrillin
  • Fibronectin
  • Gastrulation
  • Morphogenesis microscopy
  • Segmentation
  • Time-lapse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Embryology

Cite this

Dynamic imaging of cell, extracellular matrix, and tissue movements during avian vertebral axis patterning. / Filla, Michael B.; Czirók, A.; Zamir, Evan A.; Little, Charles D.; Cheuvront, Tracey J.; Rongish, Brenda J.

In: Birth Defects Research Part C - Embryo Today: Reviews, Vol. 72, No. 3, 09.2004, p. 267-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Filla, Michael B. ; Czirók, A. ; Zamir, Evan A. ; Little, Charles D. ; Cheuvront, Tracey J. ; Rongish, Brenda J. / Dynamic imaging of cell, extracellular matrix, and tissue movements during avian vertebral axis patterning. In: Birth Defects Research Part C - Embryo Today: Reviews. 2004 ; Vol. 72, No. 3. pp. 267-276.
@article{565a2a308a914368b2eb9ca1144604ac,
title = "Dynamic imaging of cell, extracellular matrix, and tissue movements during avian vertebral axis patterning",
abstract = "Vertebrate axis patterning depends on cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) repositioning and proper cell-ECM interactions. However, there are few in vivo data addressing how large-scale tissue deformations are coordinated with the motion of local cell ensembles or the displacement of ECM constituents. Combining the methods of dynamic imaging and experimental biology allows both cell and ECM fate-mapping to be correlated with ongoing tissue deformations. These fate-mapping studies suggest that the axial ECM components {"}move{"} both as a composite meshwork and as autonomous particles, depending on the length scale being examined. Cells are also part of this composite, and subject to passive displacements resulting from tissue deformations. However, in contrast to the ECM, cells are self-propelled. The net result of cell and ECM displacements, along with proper ECM-cell adhesion, is the assembly of new tissue architecture. Data herein show that disruption of normal cell-ECM interactions during axis formation results in developmental abnormalities and a disorganization of the ECM. Our goal in characterizing the global displacement patterns of axial cells and ECM is to provide critical information regarding existing strain fields in the segmental plate and paraxial mesoderm. Deducing the mechanical influences on cell behavior is critical, if we are to understand vertebral axis patterning. Supplementary material for this article is available online at http://www.mrw.interscience.wiley.com/suppmat/ 1542-975X/suppmat/72/v72.266.html.",
keywords = "Fibrillin, Fibronectin, Gastrulation, Morphogenesis microscopy, Segmentation, Time-lapse",
author = "Filla, {Michael B.} and A. Czir{\'o}k and Zamir, {Evan A.} and Little, {Charles D.} and Cheuvront, {Tracey J.} and Rongish, {Brenda J.}",
year = "2004",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1002/bdrc.20020",
language = "English",
volume = "72",
pages = "267--276",
journal = "Birth Defects Research Part C - Embryo Today: Reviews",
issn = "1542-975X",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dynamic imaging of cell, extracellular matrix, and tissue movements during avian vertebral axis patterning

AU - Filla, Michael B.

AU - Czirók, A.

AU - Zamir, Evan A.

AU - Little, Charles D.

AU - Cheuvront, Tracey J.

AU - Rongish, Brenda J.

PY - 2004/9

Y1 - 2004/9

N2 - Vertebrate axis patterning depends on cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) repositioning and proper cell-ECM interactions. However, there are few in vivo data addressing how large-scale tissue deformations are coordinated with the motion of local cell ensembles or the displacement of ECM constituents. Combining the methods of dynamic imaging and experimental biology allows both cell and ECM fate-mapping to be correlated with ongoing tissue deformations. These fate-mapping studies suggest that the axial ECM components "move" both as a composite meshwork and as autonomous particles, depending on the length scale being examined. Cells are also part of this composite, and subject to passive displacements resulting from tissue deformations. However, in contrast to the ECM, cells are self-propelled. The net result of cell and ECM displacements, along with proper ECM-cell adhesion, is the assembly of new tissue architecture. Data herein show that disruption of normal cell-ECM interactions during axis formation results in developmental abnormalities and a disorganization of the ECM. Our goal in characterizing the global displacement patterns of axial cells and ECM is to provide critical information regarding existing strain fields in the segmental plate and paraxial mesoderm. Deducing the mechanical influences on cell behavior is critical, if we are to understand vertebral axis patterning. Supplementary material for this article is available online at http://www.mrw.interscience.wiley.com/suppmat/ 1542-975X/suppmat/72/v72.266.html.

AB - Vertebrate axis patterning depends on cell and extracellular matrix (ECM) repositioning and proper cell-ECM interactions. However, there are few in vivo data addressing how large-scale tissue deformations are coordinated with the motion of local cell ensembles or the displacement of ECM constituents. Combining the methods of dynamic imaging and experimental biology allows both cell and ECM fate-mapping to be correlated with ongoing tissue deformations. These fate-mapping studies suggest that the axial ECM components "move" both as a composite meshwork and as autonomous particles, depending on the length scale being examined. Cells are also part of this composite, and subject to passive displacements resulting from tissue deformations. However, in contrast to the ECM, cells are self-propelled. The net result of cell and ECM displacements, along with proper ECM-cell adhesion, is the assembly of new tissue architecture. Data herein show that disruption of normal cell-ECM interactions during axis formation results in developmental abnormalities and a disorganization of the ECM. Our goal in characterizing the global displacement patterns of axial cells and ECM is to provide critical information regarding existing strain fields in the segmental plate and paraxial mesoderm. Deducing the mechanical influences on cell behavior is critical, if we are to understand vertebral axis patterning. Supplementary material for this article is available online at http://www.mrw.interscience.wiley.com/suppmat/ 1542-975X/suppmat/72/v72.266.html.

KW - Fibrillin

KW - Fibronectin

KW - Gastrulation

KW - Morphogenesis microscopy

KW - Segmentation

KW - Time-lapse

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=9644295539&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=9644295539&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/bdrc.20020

DO - 10.1002/bdrc.20020

M3 - Article

C2 - 15495182

AN - SCOPUS:9644295539

VL - 72

SP - 267

EP - 276

JO - Birth Defects Research Part C - Embryo Today: Reviews

JF - Birth Defects Research Part C - Embryo Today: Reviews

SN - 1542-975X

IS - 3

ER -