Dogs discriminate between barks

The effect of context and identity of the caller

Csaba Molnár, P. Pongrácz, Tamás Faragó, A. Dóka, A. Miklósi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the present study we explored whether dogs (Canis familiaris) are able to discriminate between conspecific barks emitted in different contexts recorded either from the same or different individuals. Playback experiments were conducted with dogs using barks as stimuli in a habituation-dishabituation paradigm. Barks were recorded in two contexts (stranger at the fence and when the dog was left alone) from different individuals. We found that dogs distinguished between barks emitted in these two contexts and were also able to discriminate between different individuals which were barking in the same context. These findings suggest that dog bark may carry context- and individual-specific information for the conspecifics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)198-201
Number of pages4
JournalBehavioural Processes
Volume82
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2009

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Keywords

  • Bark
  • Communication
  • Dogs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Dogs discriminate between barks : The effect of context and identity of the caller. / Molnár, Csaba; Pongrácz, P.; Faragó, Tamás; Dóka, A.; Miklósi, A.

In: Behavioural Processes, Vol. 82, No. 2, 10.2009, p. 198-201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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