Do urinary tract infections trigger chronic kidney transplant rejection in man?

V. Müller, Gerold Becker, Michael Delfs, Karl Heinz Albrecht, Thomas Philipp, Uwe Heemann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Urinary tract infections are frequent after kidney transplantation but little is known about the impact on long-term survival. As chronic rejection is the major cause of graft loss in the long term, we retrospectively analyzed the role of urinary tract infections in this process. Materials and Methods: We included in the study all adult patients who received kidney transplants at our unit between 1972 and 1991, which ensured followup of at least 5 years, and we focused on the relationship between urinary tract infections and the incidence of chronic rejection episodes. To analyze the influence of urinary tract infections on chronic rejection patients were separated into those in whom biopsy proved chronic rejection developed within the first 5 years after transplantation (chronic rejection group 225) and those without apparent signs of chronic rejection during that period (control group 351). The correlation between urinary tract infections per year and the incidence of chronic rejection was analyzed. Results: Patients with chronic rejection had more urinary tract infections per year than controls. In the first year after transplantation both groups had the highest incidence of urinary tract infections but thereafter the rate of urinary tract infections per year declined. However, the incidence consistently remained higher in the chronic rejection group. This difference reached significance by year 3 after transplantation. Furthermore, a high rate of urinary tract infections correlated with an early onset of chronic rejection. Conclusions: Urinary tract infections are an important risk factor for the onset of chronic rejection, and early and intense treatment is critical.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1826-1829
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume159
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1998

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Graft Rejection
Urinary Tract Infections
Kidney
Incidence
Transplantation
Transplants
Kidney Transplantation
Biopsy
Control Groups
Survival

Keywords

  • Kidney transplantation
  • Urinary tract infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Müller, V., Becker, G., Delfs, M., Albrecht, K. H., Philipp, T., & Heemann, U. (1998). Do urinary tract infections trigger chronic kidney transplant rejection in man? Journal of Urology, 159(6), 1826-1829.

Do urinary tract infections trigger chronic kidney transplant rejection in man? / Müller, V.; Becker, Gerold; Delfs, Michael; Albrecht, Karl Heinz; Philipp, Thomas; Heemann, Uwe.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 159, No. 6, 06.1998, p. 1826-1829.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Müller, V, Becker, G, Delfs, M, Albrecht, KH, Philipp, T & Heemann, U 1998, 'Do urinary tract infections trigger chronic kidney transplant rejection in man?', Journal of Urology, vol. 159, no. 6, pp. 1826-1829.
Müller V, Becker G, Delfs M, Albrecht KH, Philipp T, Heemann U. Do urinary tract infections trigger chronic kidney transplant rejection in man? Journal of Urology. 1998 Jun;159(6):1826-1829.
Müller, V. ; Becker, Gerold ; Delfs, Michael ; Albrecht, Karl Heinz ; Philipp, Thomas ; Heemann, Uwe. / Do urinary tract infections trigger chronic kidney transplant rejection in man?. In: Journal of Urology. 1998 ; Vol. 159, No. 6. pp. 1826-1829.
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