Do predation rates of artificial nests differ between edge and interior reedbed habitats?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Forest studies suggest that habitat fragmentation may increase nest predation at the edges. In experiments conducted along the reedbeds of the Lake Velence, and marsh Kis-Balaton (Hungary) and Lake Hornborga (Sweden), the hypothesis that nest predation rates are higher in edge than in interior reed habitats was tested. 260 artificial passerine nests containing 1 quail and 1 plasticine eggs were placed into edge and interior of reedbeds. 49% of nests were predated. There was no difference between the degree of visibility of predated and not predated nests. The Mayfield method was applied for survival estimations, since there was not increasing or decreasing trends in nest loss rates during 11 days of exposure. The difference between edge and interior nest predation rates g reatly varied according to study site and time. Therefore, the findings of many previous studies, namely that the nest predation is higher at edges, has not been supported by the present study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-56
Number of pages4
JournalActa Ornithologica
Volume35
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2000

Keywords

  • Artificial nests
  • Nest predation
  • Reedbeds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

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