Diversity of latent plant-virus interactions and their impact on the virosphere

K. R. Richert-Pöggeler, J. Mináróvits

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Viruses and viroids that are not causing symptoms on their initial host plant are described by the terms 'latent,' 'cryptic,' or 'symptomless,' and they represent 7% and 4% of the classified plant viruses and viroids, respectively. Additionally, endogenous plant pararetroviruses that reside in their host genome are often dormant and therefore asymptomatic. Improved sequencing and diagnostic technology has demonstrated that viral sequences are ubiquitously present in the biosphere even if the signs or symptoms of infection are not obvious. Accordingly, the number of latent plant viruses listed today does not reflect the true range of latent viruses existing in plants. Biodiversity within the virosphere comprises virus-host, virus-vector, virus-virus, and virus-viroid interactions. Invasion of new host plants, climatic changes, and changes in plant production and distribution can have a major impact on symptomatic outbreaks of otherwise latent viruses. Here we describe, for selected ornamentals, how these changes can induce latent viruses, and we report on possible underlying biochemical mechanisms. Comparison of virus latency in plant and animal hosts indicates that epigenetic modifications are an important factor for regulation in both systems.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPlant Virus-Host Interaction: Molecular Approaches and Viral Evolution
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages263-275
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9780124115842
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

Fingerprint

Plant Viruses
Viruses
Viroids
Plant Dispersal
Virus Latency
Biodiversity
Epigenomics
Signs and Symptoms
Disease Outbreaks
Genome
Technology

Keywords

  • Endogenous pararetrovirus
  • Epigenetic regulation
  • Herpesvirus
  • Latent viruses
  • Ornamental plant viruses
  • Retrovirus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Richert-Pöggeler, K. R., & Mináróvits, J. (2014). Diversity of latent plant-virus interactions and their impact on the virosphere. In Plant Virus-Host Interaction: Molecular Approaches and Viral Evolution (pp. 263-275). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-411584-2.00014-7

Diversity of latent plant-virus interactions and their impact on the virosphere. / Richert-Pöggeler, K. R.; Mináróvits, J.

Plant Virus-Host Interaction: Molecular Approaches and Viral Evolution. Elsevier Inc., 2014. p. 263-275.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Richert-Pöggeler, KR & Mináróvits, J 2014, Diversity of latent plant-virus interactions and their impact on the virosphere. in Plant Virus-Host Interaction: Molecular Approaches and Viral Evolution. Elsevier Inc., pp. 263-275. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-411584-2.00014-7
Richert-Pöggeler KR, Mináróvits J. Diversity of latent plant-virus interactions and their impact on the virosphere. In Plant Virus-Host Interaction: Molecular Approaches and Viral Evolution. Elsevier Inc. 2014. p. 263-275 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-411584-2.00014-7
Richert-Pöggeler, K. R. ; Mináróvits, J. / Diversity of latent plant-virus interactions and their impact on the virosphere. Plant Virus-Host Interaction: Molecular Approaches and Viral Evolution. Elsevier Inc., 2014. pp. 263-275
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