Diversity and convergences in the evolution of feeding adaptations in ankylosaurs (Dinosauria: Ornithischia)*

A. Ősi, Edina Prondvai, Jordan Mallon, Emese Réka Bodor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ankylosaurian dinosaurs were low-browsing quadrupeds that were traditionally thought of as simple orthal pulpers exhibiting minimal tooth occlusion during feeding, as in many extant lizards. Recent studies, however, have demonstrated that effective chewing with tooth occlusion and palinal jaw movement was present in some members of this group. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of feeding characters (i.e. craniodental features, tooth wear patterns, origin and insertion of jaw adductors) reveal at least three different jaw mechanisms during the evolution of Ankylosauria. Whereas, in basal members, food processing was restricted to simple orthal pulping, in late Early and Late Cretaceous North American and European forms a precise tooth occlusion evolved convergently in many lineages (including nodosaurids and ankylosaurids) complemented by palinal power stroke. In contrast, Asian forms retained the primitive mode of feeding without any biphasal chewing, a phenomenon that might relate to the different types of vegetation consumed by these low-level feeders in different habitats on different landmasses. Further, a progressive widening of the muzzle is demonstrated both in Late Cretaceous North American and Asian ankylosaurs, and the width and general shape of the muzzle probably correlates with foraging time and food type, as in herbivorous mammals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-32
Number of pages32
JournalHistorical Biology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jul 20 2016

Fingerprint

Jaw
jaws
Tooth
teeth
Mastication
mastication
Dinosaurs
Tooth Wear
pulping
Food Handling
Lizards
Asian Americans
browsing
qualitative analysis
stroke
food processing
vegetation types
Ecosystem
lizards
quantitative analysis

Keywords

  • Ankylosauria
  • dental occlusion
  • feeding characters
  • herbivory
  • palinal jaw movement
  • tooth wear

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Diversity and convergences in the evolution of feeding adaptations in ankylosaurs (Dinosauria : Ornithischia)*. / Ősi, A.; Prondvai, Edina; Mallon, Jordan; Bodor, Emese Réka.

In: Historical Biology, 20.07.2016, p. 1-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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