Distribution of protein kinase C isozymes in rat optic nerves

S. Komoly, Y. Liu, H. DeF. Webster, K. F J Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Light (LM) and electron (EM) microscopic immunocytochemical methods were used to study the distribution of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in adult rat optic nerves. In cryostat and vibratome sections examined by LM, type II (β) isozyme was localized almost exclusively in the axons. In the EM, immunoreaction products were found to associate with microtubules and neurofilaments. The inner surface of axonal membranes were occasionally stained. Analysis of PKC isozyme composition of the optic nerves by using immunoblot techniques revealed that type II (β) isozyme accounted for approximately 80% of the total immunoreactivity. By contrast, type III (α) isozyme, which accounted for the remaining 20% of PKC, was found mainly in the astrocytes. Astrocytic processes next to blood vessels and between myelinated axons were stained. In the EM, immunoreaction products were found in the cytoplasm and along astroglial filaments. Segments of plasma membranes also were stained; but nuclei were unstained. Adult glial cells were not stained by an antibody to type II (β) isozyme except for the occurrence of a few punctate cytoplasmic densities in occasional astrocytes. Very faint or no immunostaining was observed in sections treated with a monoclonal antibody to type I (γ) isozyme. Immunoblot analyses also did not reveal this subspecies. The absence of type I (T) isozyme in optic nerves is not due to a down-regulation of the enzyme during development. In developing (5 and 11 day) rats, immunoreactivity of protein kinase C was very faint or absent. After 15 days, reaction products of both type III (α) and type II (β) isozymes were found throughout the nerve. These findings suggest that type II (β) isozyme may be involved in axonal transport whereas type III (α) isozyme may play a role in some astrocyte functions in mature optic nerves.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)379-389
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Optic Nerve
Protein Kinase C
Isoenzymes
Astrocytes
Axons
Axonal Transport
Intermediate Filaments
Microtubules
Neuroglia
Blood Vessels
Cytoplasm
Down-Regulation
Monoclonal Antibodies
Cell Membrane
Electrons
Light
Membranes
Antibodies

Keywords

  • astrocytes
  • axons
  • glial filaments
  • isozymes
  • microtubule
  • optic nerve
  • protein kinase C

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Distribution of protein kinase C isozymes in rat optic nerves. / Komoly, S.; Liu, Y.; DeF. Webster, H.; Chan, K. F J.

In: Journal of Neuroscience Research, Vol. 29, No. 3, 1991, p. 379-389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Komoly, S. ; Liu, Y. ; DeF. Webster, H. ; Chan, K. F J. / Distribution of protein kinase C isozymes in rat optic nerves. In: Journal of Neuroscience Research. 1991 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 379-389.
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abstract = "Light (LM) and electron (EM) microscopic immunocytochemical methods were used to study the distribution of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in adult rat optic nerves. In cryostat and vibratome sections examined by LM, type II (β) isozyme was localized almost exclusively in the axons. In the EM, immunoreaction products were found to associate with microtubules and neurofilaments. The inner surface of axonal membranes were occasionally stained. Analysis of PKC isozyme composition of the optic nerves by using immunoblot techniques revealed that type II (β) isozyme accounted for approximately 80{\%} of the total immunoreactivity. By contrast, type III (α) isozyme, which accounted for the remaining 20{\%} of PKC, was found mainly in the astrocytes. Astrocytic processes next to blood vessels and between myelinated axons were stained. In the EM, immunoreaction products were found in the cytoplasm and along astroglial filaments. Segments of plasma membranes also were stained; but nuclei were unstained. Adult glial cells were not stained by an antibody to type II (β) isozyme except for the occurrence of a few punctate cytoplasmic densities in occasional astrocytes. Very faint or no immunostaining was observed in sections treated with a monoclonal antibody to type I (γ) isozyme. Immunoblot analyses also did not reveal this subspecies. The absence of type I (T) isozyme in optic nerves is not due to a down-regulation of the enzyme during development. In developing (5 and 11 day) rats, immunoreactivity of protein kinase C was very faint or absent. After 15 days, reaction products of both type III (α) and type II (β) isozymes were found throughout the nerve. These findings suggest that type II (β) isozyme may be involved in axonal transport whereas type III (α) isozyme may play a role in some astrocyte functions in mature optic nerves.",
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