Distribution of GABAergic interneurons immunoreactive for calretinin, calbindin D(28K), and parvalbumin in the cerebral cortex of the lizard Podarcis hispanica

F. J. Martinez-Guijarro, T. Freund

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Abstract

The types and distribution of cells containing three calcium-binding proteins, calretinin, calbindin D(28K), and parvalbumin, have been studied by immunocytochemistry in different areas of the cerebral cortex of lizards. Cross-reactivity of the antisera has been excluded by demonstrating the existence of several cell groups immunoreactive for one but not the other two calcium-binding proteins. In the dorsal and dorsomedial cortices all three proteins coexist in a single subpopulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons, the terminals of which form pericellular baskets around cell bodies of bipyramidal neurons. The somata of these neurons are largely restricted to the cellular and inner plexiform layers, but the dendrites usually penetrate all layers, allowing the neurons to sample input from all possible sources. A small number of parvalbumin-containing neurons in the outer plexiform layer do not contain the other two proteins. The medial cortex, which is likely to be homologous to the mammalian dentate gyrus, only contains parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons. The dendritic trees of these cells appear to avoid the Timm-positive fields receiving input from zinc-rich fiber collaterals, originating from principal cells. The lateral cortex contains calbindin D(28K)-immunoreactive GABAergic neurons, which lack the other two calcium-binding proteins. These neurons have horizontally running dendrites in the outer plexiform layer, but their axon terminals could not be visualized. The present study uncovered important similarities and differences between the lizard and the mammalian archicortex in the types of neurons containing calcium-binding proteins. As in mammals, different cell types evolved in the lizard to inhibit the perisomatic versus the distal dendritic region of principal cells, the calcium-binding protein-containing neurons being responsible for the former, and neuropeptide-containing neurons for the latter. The results also suggest that further neurochemical diversion of GABAergic interneurons coupled to a functional specialization took place during phylogenetic development from reptiles to mammals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)449-460
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Comparative Neurology
Volume322
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1992

Fingerprint

Calbindin 2
Calbindins
Parvalbumins
Lizards
Interneurons
Cerebral Cortex
Calcium-Binding Proteins
Neurons
GABAergic Neurons
Dendrites
Mammals
Aminobutyrates
Reptiles
Dentate Gyrus
Presynaptic Terminals
Carisoprodol
Neuropeptides
Running
Dendritic Cells
Zinc

Keywords

  • calcium-binding proteins
  • inhibition
  • interneurons
  • nonpyramidal cells
  • reptiles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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title = "Distribution of GABAergic interneurons immunoreactive for calretinin, calbindin D(28K), and parvalbumin in the cerebral cortex of the lizard Podarcis hispanica",
abstract = "The types and distribution of cells containing three calcium-binding proteins, calretinin, calbindin D(28K), and parvalbumin, have been studied by immunocytochemistry in different areas of the cerebral cortex of lizards. Cross-reactivity of the antisera has been excluded by demonstrating the existence of several cell groups immunoreactive for one but not the other two calcium-binding proteins. In the dorsal and dorsomedial cortices all three proteins coexist in a single subpopulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons, the terminals of which form pericellular baskets around cell bodies of bipyramidal neurons. The somata of these neurons are largely restricted to the cellular and inner plexiform layers, but the dendrites usually penetrate all layers, allowing the neurons to sample input from all possible sources. A small number of parvalbumin-containing neurons in the outer plexiform layer do not contain the other two proteins. The medial cortex, which is likely to be homologous to the mammalian dentate gyrus, only contains parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons. The dendritic trees of these cells appear to avoid the Timm-positive fields receiving input from zinc-rich fiber collaterals, originating from principal cells. The lateral cortex contains calbindin D(28K)-immunoreactive GABAergic neurons, which lack the other two calcium-binding proteins. These neurons have horizontally running dendrites in the outer plexiform layer, but their axon terminals could not be visualized. The present study uncovered important similarities and differences between the lizard and the mammalian archicortex in the types of neurons containing calcium-binding proteins. As in mammals, different cell types evolved in the lizard to inhibit the perisomatic versus the distal dendritic region of principal cells, the calcium-binding protein-containing neurons being responsible for the former, and neuropeptide-containing neurons for the latter. The results also suggest that further neurochemical diversion of GABAergic interneurons coupled to a functional specialization took place during phylogenetic development from reptiles to mammals.",
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N2 - The types and distribution of cells containing three calcium-binding proteins, calretinin, calbindin D(28K), and parvalbumin, have been studied by immunocytochemistry in different areas of the cerebral cortex of lizards. Cross-reactivity of the antisera has been excluded by demonstrating the existence of several cell groups immunoreactive for one but not the other two calcium-binding proteins. In the dorsal and dorsomedial cortices all three proteins coexist in a single subpopulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons, the terminals of which form pericellular baskets around cell bodies of bipyramidal neurons. The somata of these neurons are largely restricted to the cellular and inner plexiform layers, but the dendrites usually penetrate all layers, allowing the neurons to sample input from all possible sources. A small number of parvalbumin-containing neurons in the outer plexiform layer do not contain the other two proteins. The medial cortex, which is likely to be homologous to the mammalian dentate gyrus, only contains parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons. The dendritic trees of these cells appear to avoid the Timm-positive fields receiving input from zinc-rich fiber collaterals, originating from principal cells. The lateral cortex contains calbindin D(28K)-immunoreactive GABAergic neurons, which lack the other two calcium-binding proteins. These neurons have horizontally running dendrites in the outer plexiform layer, but their axon terminals could not be visualized. The present study uncovered important similarities and differences between the lizard and the mammalian archicortex in the types of neurons containing calcium-binding proteins. As in mammals, different cell types evolved in the lizard to inhibit the perisomatic versus the distal dendritic region of principal cells, the calcium-binding protein-containing neurons being responsible for the former, and neuropeptide-containing neurons for the latter. The results also suggest that further neurochemical diversion of GABAergic interneurons coupled to a functional specialization took place during phylogenetic development from reptiles to mammals.

AB - The types and distribution of cells containing three calcium-binding proteins, calretinin, calbindin D(28K), and parvalbumin, have been studied by immunocytochemistry in different areas of the cerebral cortex of lizards. Cross-reactivity of the antisera has been excluded by demonstrating the existence of several cell groups immunoreactive for one but not the other two calcium-binding proteins. In the dorsal and dorsomedial cortices all three proteins coexist in a single subpopulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons, the terminals of which form pericellular baskets around cell bodies of bipyramidal neurons. The somata of these neurons are largely restricted to the cellular and inner plexiform layers, but the dendrites usually penetrate all layers, allowing the neurons to sample input from all possible sources. A small number of parvalbumin-containing neurons in the outer plexiform layer do not contain the other two proteins. The medial cortex, which is likely to be homologous to the mammalian dentate gyrus, only contains parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons. The dendritic trees of these cells appear to avoid the Timm-positive fields receiving input from zinc-rich fiber collaterals, originating from principal cells. The lateral cortex contains calbindin D(28K)-immunoreactive GABAergic neurons, which lack the other two calcium-binding proteins. These neurons have horizontally running dendrites in the outer plexiform layer, but their axon terminals could not be visualized. The present study uncovered important similarities and differences between the lizard and the mammalian archicortex in the types of neurons containing calcium-binding proteins. As in mammals, different cell types evolved in the lizard to inhibit the perisomatic versus the distal dendritic region of principal cells, the calcium-binding protein-containing neurons being responsible for the former, and neuropeptide-containing neurons for the latter. The results also suggest that further neurochemical diversion of GABAergic interneurons coupled to a functional specialization took place during phylogenetic development from reptiles to mammals.

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