Distribution and repair of bipyrimidine photoproducts in solar UV-irradiated mammalian cells: Possible role of dewar photoproducts in solar mutagenesis

Daniel Perdiz, P. Gróf, Mauro Mezzina, Osamu Nikaido, Ethel Moustacchi, Evelyne Sage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In order to better understand the relative contribution of the different UV components of sunlight to solar mutagenesis, the distribution of the bipyrimidine photolesions, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD), (6-4) photoproducts ((6-4)PP), and their Dewar valence photoisomers (DewarPP) was examined in Chinese hamster ovary cells irradiated with UVC, UVB, or UVA radiation or simulated sunlight. The absolute amount of each type of photoproduct was measured by using a calibrated and sensitive immuno-dot-blot assay. As already established for UVC and UVB, we report the production of CPD by UVA radiation, at a yield in accordance with the DNA absorption spectrum. At biologically relevant doses, DewarPP were more efficiently produced by simulated solar light than by UVB (ratios of DewarPP to (6-4)PP of 1:3 and 1:8, respectively), but were detected neither after UVA nor after UVC radiation. The comparative rates of formation for CPD, (6-4)PP and DewarPP are 1:0.25 for UVC, 1:0.12:0.014 for UVB, and 1:0.18:0.06 for simulated sunlight. The repair rates of these photoproducts were also studied in nucleotide excision repair-proficient cells irradiated with UVB, UVA radiation, or simulated sunlight. Interestingly, DewarPP were eliminated slowly, inefficiently, and at the same rate as CPD. In contrast, removal of (6-4) photoproducts was rapid and completed 24 h after exposure. Altogether, our results indicate that, in addition to CPD and (6-4)PP, DewarPP may play a role in solar cytotoxicity and mutagenesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26732-26742
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume275
Issue number35
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2000

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Dewars
Pyrimidine Dimers
Mutagenesis
Sunlight
Repair
Cells
Radiation
Cytotoxicity
Cricetulus
DNA Repair
Absorption spectra
Ovary
Assays
Nucleotides
Light
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

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Distribution and repair of bipyrimidine photoproducts in solar UV-irradiated mammalian cells : Possible role of dewar photoproducts in solar mutagenesis. / Perdiz, Daniel; Gróf, P.; Mezzina, Mauro; Nikaido, Osamu; Moustacchi, Ethel; Sage, Evelyne.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 275, No. 35, 01.09.2000, p. 26732-26742.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perdiz, Daniel ; Gróf, P. ; Mezzina, Mauro ; Nikaido, Osamu ; Moustacchi, Ethel ; Sage, Evelyne. / Distribution and repair of bipyrimidine photoproducts in solar UV-irradiated mammalian cells : Possible role of dewar photoproducts in solar mutagenesis. In: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2000 ; Vol. 275, No. 35. pp. 26732-26742.
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