Distribution and possible immobilization of lead in a forest soil (Luvisol) profile

Péter Sipos, Tibor Németh, I. Mohai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Geochemical analyses using a sequential extraction method and lead adsorption studies were carried out in order to characterize the distribution and adsorption of lead on each genetic horizon of a Luvisol profile developed on a pelagic clayey aleurolite. Clay illuviation is the most important pedogenic process in the profile studied. Its clay mineralogy is characterized by chlorite/vermiculite species with increasing chlorite component downward. The amount of carbonate minerals strongly increases in the lower part of the profile resulting in an abrupt rise in soil pH within a small distance. The Pb content of the soil profile exceeds the natural geochemical background only in the Ao horizon, and its amount decreases with depth in the profile without correcting for differences in bulk density, suggesting the binding of Pb to soil organic matter. According to the sequential extraction analysis the organic matter and carbonate content of the soil have the most significant effect on lead distribution. This effect varies in the different soil horizons. Lead adsorption experiments were carried out on whole soil samples, soil clay fractions, as well as on their carbonate and organic matter free variant. The different soil horizons adsorb lead to different extents depending on their organic matter, clay mineral and carbonate content; and the mineralogical features of soil clays significantly affect their lead adsorption capacity. The clay fraction adsorbs 25 more lead than the whole soil, while in the calcareous subsoil a significant proportion of lead is precipitated due to the alkaline conditions. 10 and 5 of adsorbed Pb can be leached with distilled water in the organic matter and clay mineral dominated soil horizons, respectively. These results suggest that soil organic matter plays a decisive role in the adsorption of Pb, but the fixation by clay minerals is stronger.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Geochemistry and Health
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2005

Fingerprint

Luvisol
Immobilization
immobilization
forest soil
Soil
Lead
Soils
adsorption
soil horizon
Biological materials
clay mineral
carbonate
organic matter
Adsorption
Carbonates
Clay
clay soil
clay
chlorite
Minerals

Keywords

  • Adsorption
  • Geochemistry
  • Lead
  • Luvisol
  • Sequential extraction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Engineering
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Distribution and possible immobilization of lead in a forest soil (Luvisol) profile. / Sipos, Péter; Németh, Tibor; Mohai, I.

In: Environmental Geochemistry and Health, Vol. 27, No. 1, 02.2005, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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