Dissolution and off-stoichiometric formation of compound layers in solid state reactions

Z. Erdélyi, D. Beke, Andriy Taranovskyy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In many technological processes, intermediate phases are produced by solid state reactions (SSRs) of pure materials initially layered onto each other. It is generally accepted that during heat treatments of such structures, stoichiometric compound films form and then grow, or if such a layer already exists then it growths further. We show that in many realistic cases the compound layer forms and starts to grow highly off stoichiometrically. Moreover, an initially existing stoichiometric compound layer may dissolve then off stoichiometrically reform. Our findings are of primary importance for nanotechnologies where early stages of SSR are utilized; e.g., metallization for silicon-based devices in micro-/nanoelectronics.

Original languageEnglish
Article number133110
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume92
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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dissolving
solid state
nanotechnology
heat treatment
silicon

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Dissolution and off-stoichiometric formation of compound layers in solid state reactions. / Erdélyi, Z.; Beke, D.; Taranovskyy, Andriy.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 92, No. 13, 133110, 2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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