Dispersal of individuals of the flightless grassland ground beetle, Carabus hungaricus (Coleoptera

Carabidae), in three populations and what they tell us about mobility estimates based on mark-recapture

Z. Elek, Lukáš Drag, Pavel Pokluda, Lukáš Čížek, Sándor Bérces

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Knowledge of the dispersal ability of endangered species is crucial for developing effective, evidence-based conservation policies. Due to their limited dispersal abilities and specific habitat requirements, insects are among the animals most threatened by habitat fragmentation. We studied three populations of the highly endangered species of ground beetle, Carabus hungaricus, at three sites in Central Europe (Hungary and Czech Republic) using mark-release-recapture (MRR). The total catch of 574 pitfall traps set at the three sites was 6255 individuals. Depending on the site, the percentage recaptured was 13-32%. Average and maximum distance moved by individuals of both sexes at each of the sites ranged between 47-132 and 207-1104 m, respectively. The probability of the movements following an inverse power function (IPF) for the two sexes did not differ, but did differ among sites. Probability of dispersing for distances >100 m differed by an order of magnitude between sites, most likely because of differences in how the samples were collected. Despite the fact that individual beetles are able to move over distances in the order of kilometres, the high fragmentation of their habitats is likely to prevent them from colonizing most uninhabited habitat patches. Therefore, the conservation of this threatened ground beetle could be improved by adopting and implementing a policy of assisted dispersal. Our results from three study sites also provide an interesting illustration of the variability in the estimates of the probability of dispersal obtained using MRR.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)663-668
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Entomology
Volume111
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Carabidae
mark-recapture studies
grasslands
Coleoptera
endangered species
habitat fragmentation
gender
pitfall traps
habitats
Central European region
Hungary
Czech Republic
insects
animals
sampling

Keywords

  • Carabidae
  • Carabus hungaricus
  • Coleoptera
  • Czech Republic
  • Dispersal
  • Hungary
  • Inverse power function
  • Natura 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

Dispersal of individuals of the flightless grassland ground beetle, Carabus hungaricus (Coleoptera : Carabidae), in three populations and what they tell us about mobility estimates based on mark-recapture. / Elek, Z.; Drag, Lukáš; Pokluda, Pavel; Čížek, Lukáš; Bérces, Sándor.

In: European Journal of Entomology, Vol. 111, No. 5, 2014, p. 663-668.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{518b6861ad874d32bd87f38d717482bf,
title = "Dispersal of individuals of the flightless grassland ground beetle, Carabus hungaricus (Coleoptera: Carabidae), in three populations and what they tell us about mobility estimates based on mark-recapture",
abstract = "Knowledge of the dispersal ability of endangered species is crucial for developing effective, evidence-based conservation policies. Due to their limited dispersal abilities and specific habitat requirements, insects are among the animals most threatened by habitat fragmentation. We studied three populations of the highly endangered species of ground beetle, Carabus hungaricus, at three sites in Central Europe (Hungary and Czech Republic) using mark-release-recapture (MRR). The total catch of 574 pitfall traps set at the three sites was 6255 individuals. Depending on the site, the percentage recaptured was 13-32{\%}. Average and maximum distance moved by individuals of both sexes at each of the sites ranged between 47-132 and 207-1104 m, respectively. The probability of the movements following an inverse power function (IPF) for the two sexes did not differ, but did differ among sites. Probability of dispersing for distances >100 m differed by an order of magnitude between sites, most likely because of differences in how the samples were collected. Despite the fact that individual beetles are able to move over distances in the order of kilometres, the high fragmentation of their habitats is likely to prevent them from colonizing most uninhabited habitat patches. Therefore, the conservation of this threatened ground beetle could be improved by adopting and implementing a policy of assisted dispersal. Our results from three study sites also provide an interesting illustration of the variability in the estimates of the probability of dispersal obtained using MRR.",
keywords = "Carabidae, Carabus hungaricus, Coleoptera, Czech Republic, Dispersal, Hungary, Inverse power function, Natura 2000",
author = "Z. Elek and Luk{\'a}š Drag and Pavel Pokluda and Luk{\'a}š Č{\'i}žek and S{\'a}ndor B{\'e}rces",
year = "2014",
doi = "10.14411/eje.2014.080",
language = "English",
volume = "111",
pages = "663--668",
journal = "European Journal of Entomology",
issn = "1210-5759",
publisher = "Czech Academy of Sciences",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dispersal of individuals of the flightless grassland ground beetle, Carabus hungaricus (Coleoptera

T2 - Carabidae), in three populations and what they tell us about mobility estimates based on mark-recapture

AU - Elek, Z.

AU - Drag, Lukáš

AU - Pokluda, Pavel

AU - Čížek, Lukáš

AU - Bérces, Sándor

PY - 2014

Y1 - 2014

N2 - Knowledge of the dispersal ability of endangered species is crucial for developing effective, evidence-based conservation policies. Due to their limited dispersal abilities and specific habitat requirements, insects are among the animals most threatened by habitat fragmentation. We studied three populations of the highly endangered species of ground beetle, Carabus hungaricus, at three sites in Central Europe (Hungary and Czech Republic) using mark-release-recapture (MRR). The total catch of 574 pitfall traps set at the three sites was 6255 individuals. Depending on the site, the percentage recaptured was 13-32%. Average and maximum distance moved by individuals of both sexes at each of the sites ranged between 47-132 and 207-1104 m, respectively. The probability of the movements following an inverse power function (IPF) for the two sexes did not differ, but did differ among sites. Probability of dispersing for distances >100 m differed by an order of magnitude between sites, most likely because of differences in how the samples were collected. Despite the fact that individual beetles are able to move over distances in the order of kilometres, the high fragmentation of their habitats is likely to prevent them from colonizing most uninhabited habitat patches. Therefore, the conservation of this threatened ground beetle could be improved by adopting and implementing a policy of assisted dispersal. Our results from three study sites also provide an interesting illustration of the variability in the estimates of the probability of dispersal obtained using MRR.

AB - Knowledge of the dispersal ability of endangered species is crucial for developing effective, evidence-based conservation policies. Due to their limited dispersal abilities and specific habitat requirements, insects are among the animals most threatened by habitat fragmentation. We studied three populations of the highly endangered species of ground beetle, Carabus hungaricus, at three sites in Central Europe (Hungary and Czech Republic) using mark-release-recapture (MRR). The total catch of 574 pitfall traps set at the three sites was 6255 individuals. Depending on the site, the percentage recaptured was 13-32%. Average and maximum distance moved by individuals of both sexes at each of the sites ranged between 47-132 and 207-1104 m, respectively. The probability of the movements following an inverse power function (IPF) for the two sexes did not differ, but did differ among sites. Probability of dispersing for distances >100 m differed by an order of magnitude between sites, most likely because of differences in how the samples were collected. Despite the fact that individual beetles are able to move over distances in the order of kilometres, the high fragmentation of their habitats is likely to prevent them from colonizing most uninhabited habitat patches. Therefore, the conservation of this threatened ground beetle could be improved by adopting and implementing a policy of assisted dispersal. Our results from three study sites also provide an interesting illustration of the variability in the estimates of the probability of dispersal obtained using MRR.

KW - Carabidae

KW - Carabus hungaricus

KW - Coleoptera

KW - Czech Republic

KW - Dispersal

KW - Hungary

KW - Inverse power function

KW - Natura 2000

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84919691543&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84919691543&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.14411/eje.2014.080

DO - 10.14411/eje.2014.080

M3 - Article

VL - 111

SP - 663

EP - 668

JO - European Journal of Entomology

JF - European Journal of Entomology

SN - 1210-5759

IS - 5

ER -