Discrimination of polymers by using their characteristic collision energy in tandem mass spectrometry

Andreas Nasioudis, Antony Memboeuf, Ron M A Heeren, Donald F. Smith, K. Vékey, L. Drahos, Oscar F. Van Den Brink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The characteristic collision energy to obtain 50% fragmentation, expressed as the characteristic collision voltage (CCV), was used as a tool to discriminate different classes of polymers. The CCV value of different polymers was determined in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Good linear correlation (0.980 <R2 <0.999) between the CCV values and precursor ion mass was found for all polymers studied. The position of the various linear trend lines varied among the various polymers, which allowed their grouping based on the respective CCV values. The collision energy necessary to drive fragmentation was decreasing in the order of polyethers > polymethacrylates > polyesters > polysaccharides. This suggests that polysaccharides fragment most easily (low CCVs), while polyethers require the highest collision energy among the polymers studied. The effect of end group on the CCV was also studied, showing a minor influence in most cases. In addition, the applicability of CCV as discriminator was studied for a mixture of (1) polylactic acid (PLA), (2) poly(tetramethylene glycol) (PTMEG), and (3) PLA-block-PTMEG-block-PLA block copolymer. Differences between the CCV values of four nominally isobaric polymers (of which two were copolymers and two were homopolymers) were observed. These results demonstrate that the insertion of a "weak" link into a polymer chain significantly affects the energy required for fragmentation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9350-9356
Number of pages7
JournalAnalytical Chemistry
Volume82
Issue number22
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 15 2010

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Mass spectrometry
Polymers
Electric potential
Glycols
Polysaccharides
Polyesters
Discriminators
Polyethers
Mass spectrometers
Homopolymerization
Block copolymers
Copolymers
Ions
poly(lactic acid)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

Cite this

Discrimination of polymers by using their characteristic collision energy in tandem mass spectrometry. / Nasioudis, Andreas; Memboeuf, Antony; Heeren, Ron M A; Smith, Donald F.; Vékey, K.; Drahos, L.; Van Den Brink, Oscar F.

In: Analytical Chemistry, Vol. 82, No. 22, 15.11.2010, p. 9350-9356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nasioudis, Andreas ; Memboeuf, Antony ; Heeren, Ron M A ; Smith, Donald F. ; Vékey, K. ; Drahos, L. ; Van Den Brink, Oscar F. / Discrimination of polymers by using their characteristic collision energy in tandem mass spectrometry. In: Analytical Chemistry. 2010 ; Vol. 82, No. 22. pp. 9350-9356.
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