Dimensional tensor invariants in geoelectric prospecting

S. Szalai, A. Novák, M. Varga, A. Frigy, M. Metwaly, K. Szokoli, L. Szarka

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

It is studied whether the one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) tensor invariants really behave like invariants in the field that is whether their values are independent from the position of the current electrodes of the tensorial geoelectric configuration and what kind of results they can produce in numerical modelling and in field situations. It was shown that: 1. the invariants are "less and less" invariants with their increasing dimension number depending more and more on the position of the current electrodes. 2. They produced smaller and smaller anomalies both in their size and amplitude making the detection and interpretation of the anomalies more and more difficult. 3a. The 1D image produced for all models stable, reliable results which are ideal for creating a starting model. 3b. In spite of the uncertainty of the 2D data they improved the quality of the fault field image which has been received using the 1D data only. In the sites with building remnants and furnace however the 2D invariant was not able to give extra information to that obtained by the 1D invariant. 3c. Although the interpretation of the 3D results may be rather complicated it proved to be more useful than that of the 2D data both in the building remnants and furnace field studies. In special cases the 3D invariant may refine the 1D image. In summary the 2D invariant which is sensible to the two-dimensional changes of the subsurface (like that of the in the field practice most often used 2D ERT configuration) and which was expected to produce the best results proved to be almost the less useful in these investigations in spite of that the investigated models were more 2D/3D than 1D. Because even for such models the 1D invariant produced the best results its application is recommended. Regarding however that the 2D and 3D invariants may refine the 1D image even if their results are more uncertain joint interpretation of all dimensional invariants could also be worthwhile. Although the refined model is more risky it can be very useful e.g. in studies where the danger factor is high, e.g. because of filtrating of dangerous fluid or fissuring on the wall of a nuclear waste deposit. In such cases it is better to warn redundantly than eventually not recognize real danger. The results of these investigations should be taken into account in every research area, where tensorial measurements could be carried out, e.g. in magnetotelluric research.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication77th EAGE Conference and Exhibition 2015
Subtitle of host publicationEarth Science for Energy and Environment
PublisherEuropean Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE
Pages1045-1049
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781510806627
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015
Event77th EAGE Conference and Exhibition 2015: Earth Science for Energy and Environment - Madrid, Spain
Duration: Jun 1 2015Jun 4 2015

Other

Other77th EAGE Conference and Exhibition 2015: Earth Science for Energy and Environment
CountrySpain
CityMadrid
Period6/1/156/4/15

Fingerprint

Tensors
tensors
hazards
furnaces
electrode
Furnaces
Magnetotellurics
anomalies
Radioactive Waste
anomaly
Electrodes
electrodes
radioactive wastes
configurations
radioactive waste
Deposits
deposits
Fluids
fluid
fluids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics

Cite this

Szalai, S., Novák, A., Varga, M., Frigy, A., Metwaly, M., Szokoli, K., & Szarka, L. (2015). Dimensional tensor invariants in geoelectric prospecting. In 77th EAGE Conference and Exhibition 2015: Earth Science for Energy and Environment (pp. 1045-1049). European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE. https://doi.org/10.3997/2214-4609.201412817

Dimensional tensor invariants in geoelectric prospecting. / Szalai, S.; Novák, A.; Varga, M.; Frigy, A.; Metwaly, M.; Szokoli, K.; Szarka, L.

77th EAGE Conference and Exhibition 2015: Earth Science for Energy and Environment. European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE, 2015. p. 1045-1049.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Szalai, S, Novák, A, Varga, M, Frigy, A, Metwaly, M, Szokoli, K & Szarka, L 2015, Dimensional tensor invariants in geoelectric prospecting. in 77th EAGE Conference and Exhibition 2015: Earth Science for Energy and Environment. European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE, pp. 1045-1049, 77th EAGE Conference and Exhibition 2015: Earth Science for Energy and Environment, Madrid, Spain, 6/1/15. https://doi.org/10.3997/2214-4609.201412817
Szalai S, Novák A, Varga M, Frigy A, Metwaly M, Szokoli K et al. Dimensional tensor invariants in geoelectric prospecting. In 77th EAGE Conference and Exhibition 2015: Earth Science for Energy and Environment. European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE. 2015. p. 1045-1049 https://doi.org/10.3997/2214-4609.201412817
Szalai, S. ; Novák, A. ; Varga, M. ; Frigy, A. ; Metwaly, M. ; Szokoli, K. ; Szarka, L. / Dimensional tensor invariants in geoelectric prospecting. 77th EAGE Conference and Exhibition 2015: Earth Science for Energy and Environment. European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers, EAGE, 2015. pp. 1045-1049
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