Difficulties in radon measurements at workplaces

Norbert Kávási, T. Kovács, Csaba Németh, Tibor Szabó, Zorán Gorjánácz, András Várhegyi, József Hakl, J. Somlai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Different legislation systems can be found in the world concerning radon levels at workplaces. Following the European Union suggestion, a reference level for radon concentration in the air at workplaces was established in several European countries. In Hungary, the relevant legislation has come into effect on 1 January 2003. The determination of average radon concentration might present a problem, especially in places where the monthly average concentrations vary to a great extent. For example, the monthly averages measured in a hospital cave used for treating respiratory diseases showed a 24-fold difference depending on the chosen month. In such cases, attention should be paid when choosing the months and using the results of measurements for dose assessment. Another uncertainty emerges when estimating the annual dose, based on the data coming from long-term measurements, usually using integrated methods such as track detectors. There is a considerable difference between the averages measured during the working hours and over the total time (including nights and weekends), mostly in the cases of rooms with frequent air change like schools, kindergartens and ventilated workplaces. This can lead to a significant overestimation in dose calculation. Special attention needs to be paid to workplaces such as mines, tunnels and open air uranium tailings sites. This paper discusses the possible inaccuracies caused by the improper selection of time periods and methods in the measurements of the average radon concentration at workplaces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)229-234
Number of pages6
JournalRadiation Measurements
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Radon
radon
Air
dosage
air
respiratory diseases
Caves
Pulmonary diseases
Tailings
Hungary
European Union
caves
Uranium
Tunnels
night
uranium
rooms
suggestion
tunnels
Detectors

Keywords

  • Dose assessment
  • Radon
  • Workplaces

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiation
  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Kávási, N., Kovács, T., Németh, C., Szabó, T., Gorjánácz, Z., Várhegyi, A., ... Somlai, J. (2015). Difficulties in radon measurements at workplaces. Radiation Measurements, 41(2), 229-234. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radmeas.2005.02.001

Difficulties in radon measurements at workplaces. / Kávási, Norbert; Kovács, T.; Németh, Csaba; Szabó, Tibor; Gorjánácz, Zorán; Várhegyi, András; Hakl, József; Somlai, J.

In: Radiation Measurements, Vol. 41, No. 2, 2015, p. 229-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kávási, N, Kovács, T, Németh, C, Szabó, T, Gorjánácz, Z, Várhegyi, A, Hakl, J & Somlai, J 2015, 'Difficulties in radon measurements at workplaces', Radiation Measurements, vol. 41, no. 2, pp. 229-234. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radmeas.2005.02.001
Kávási N, Kovács T, Németh C, Szabó T, Gorjánácz Z, Várhegyi A et al. Difficulties in radon measurements at workplaces. Radiation Measurements. 2015;41(2):229-234. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.radmeas.2005.02.001
Kávási, Norbert ; Kovács, T. ; Németh, Csaba ; Szabó, Tibor ; Gorjánácz, Zorán ; Várhegyi, András ; Hakl, József ; Somlai, J. / Difficulties in radon measurements at workplaces. In: Radiation Measurements. 2015 ; Vol. 41, No. 2. pp. 229-234.
@article{e9aa3cf839524cc687950329ed2842d9,
title = "Difficulties in radon measurements at workplaces",
abstract = "Different legislation systems can be found in the world concerning radon levels at workplaces. Following the European Union suggestion, a reference level for radon concentration in the air at workplaces was established in several European countries. In Hungary, the relevant legislation has come into effect on 1 January 2003. The determination of average radon concentration might present a problem, especially in places where the monthly average concentrations vary to a great extent. For example, the monthly averages measured in a hospital cave used for treating respiratory diseases showed a 24-fold difference depending on the chosen month. In such cases, attention should be paid when choosing the months and using the results of measurements for dose assessment. Another uncertainty emerges when estimating the annual dose, based on the data coming from long-term measurements, usually using integrated methods such as track detectors. There is a considerable difference between the averages measured during the working hours and over the total time (including nights and weekends), mostly in the cases of rooms with frequent air change like schools, kindergartens and ventilated workplaces. This can lead to a significant overestimation in dose calculation. Special attention needs to be paid to workplaces such as mines, tunnels and open air uranium tailings sites. This paper discusses the possible inaccuracies caused by the improper selection of time periods and methods in the measurements of the average radon concentration at workplaces.",
keywords = "Dose assessment, Radon, Workplaces",
author = "Norbert K{\'a}v{\'a}si and T. Kov{\'a}cs and Csaba N{\'e}meth and Tibor Szab{\'o} and Zor{\'a}n Gorj{\'a}n{\'a}cz and Andr{\'a}s V{\'a}rhegyi and J{\'o}zsef Hakl and J. Somlai",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.radmeas.2005.02.001",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "229--234",
journal = "Radiation Measurements",
issn = "1350-4487",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Difficulties in radon measurements at workplaces

AU - Kávási, Norbert

AU - Kovács, T.

AU - Németh, Csaba

AU - Szabó, Tibor

AU - Gorjánácz, Zorán

AU - Várhegyi, András

AU - Hakl, József

AU - Somlai, J.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Different legislation systems can be found in the world concerning radon levels at workplaces. Following the European Union suggestion, a reference level for radon concentration in the air at workplaces was established in several European countries. In Hungary, the relevant legislation has come into effect on 1 January 2003. The determination of average radon concentration might present a problem, especially in places where the monthly average concentrations vary to a great extent. For example, the monthly averages measured in a hospital cave used for treating respiratory diseases showed a 24-fold difference depending on the chosen month. In such cases, attention should be paid when choosing the months and using the results of measurements for dose assessment. Another uncertainty emerges when estimating the annual dose, based on the data coming from long-term measurements, usually using integrated methods such as track detectors. There is a considerable difference between the averages measured during the working hours and over the total time (including nights and weekends), mostly in the cases of rooms with frequent air change like schools, kindergartens and ventilated workplaces. This can lead to a significant overestimation in dose calculation. Special attention needs to be paid to workplaces such as mines, tunnels and open air uranium tailings sites. This paper discusses the possible inaccuracies caused by the improper selection of time periods and methods in the measurements of the average radon concentration at workplaces.

AB - Different legislation systems can be found in the world concerning radon levels at workplaces. Following the European Union suggestion, a reference level for radon concentration in the air at workplaces was established in several European countries. In Hungary, the relevant legislation has come into effect on 1 January 2003. The determination of average radon concentration might present a problem, especially in places where the monthly average concentrations vary to a great extent. For example, the monthly averages measured in a hospital cave used for treating respiratory diseases showed a 24-fold difference depending on the chosen month. In such cases, attention should be paid when choosing the months and using the results of measurements for dose assessment. Another uncertainty emerges when estimating the annual dose, based on the data coming from long-term measurements, usually using integrated methods such as track detectors. There is a considerable difference between the averages measured during the working hours and over the total time (including nights and weekends), mostly in the cases of rooms with frequent air change like schools, kindergartens and ventilated workplaces. This can lead to a significant overestimation in dose calculation. Special attention needs to be paid to workplaces such as mines, tunnels and open air uranium tailings sites. This paper discusses the possible inaccuracies caused by the improper selection of time periods and methods in the measurements of the average radon concentration at workplaces.

KW - Dose assessment

KW - Radon

KW - Workplaces

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84924019976&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84924019976&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.radmeas.2005.02.001

DO - 10.1016/j.radmeas.2005.02.001

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84924019976

VL - 41

SP - 229

EP - 234

JO - Radiation Measurements

JF - Radiation Measurements

SN - 1350-4487

IS - 2

ER -