Differential distribution of intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, ICAM-2, and ICAM-3) and the MS-1 antigen in normal and diseased human synovia: Their possible pathogenetic and clinical significance in rheumatoid arthritis

Z. Szekanecz, G. Kenneth Haines, Theodore R. Lin, Lisa A. Harlow, Sergij Goerdt, Ghazi Rayan, Alisa E. Koch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective. Cellular adhesion and differentiation molecules (CAMs) may play a role in the recruitment and retention of inflammatory cells into rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue (RA ST). In order to determine if certain CAMs are up-regulated in RA ST compared with normal ST, we studied the distribution of intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) 1, 2, and 3 in ST. We also studied the MS-1 antigen since it is preferentially expressed on discontinuous endothelia, such as those found in RA ST; MS-1 is also expressed differentially upon cytokine activation of cells in vitro or in pathologic conditions in situ. Thus, we postulated a possible similarity between MS-1 and ICAM-1 expression in inflamed ST. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to determine the distribution of ICAMs and MS-1 in ST from 10 patients with RA, 10 with osteoarthritis (OA), and 4 normal individuals. Results. ICAM-1 expression was found on significantly more RA ST endothelial cells compared with normal cells, as well as on RA ST macrophages and lining cells. ICAM-2, also found on endothelial cells, showed no differential staining pattern. ICAM-3 was present on RA ST macrophages and lining cells as well as on some RA and OA endothelial cells. The MS-1 antigen was present on most RA and OA ST endothelia, lining cells, and macrophages. ICAM-1 expression and MS-1 expression in the lining layer were positively correlated in both RA and OA. Conclusion. ICAM-1, while found mainly on endothelial cells, is up-regulated on RA ST macrophages and lining cells, suggesting a role for these cells in the infiltration and tissue damage seen in the RA ST. ICAM-3, which is present mainly on normal resting leukocytes but not on normal endothelium, is expressed by some diseased ST leukocytes and endothelial cells. MS-1 is also found on the RA ST specialized, fenestrated endothelium, on macrophages, and in the lining layer. These results suggest that the differential expression of ICAMs and MS-1 in RA ST compared with normal ST might play a special role in the pathogenesis of RA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-231
Number of pages11
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume37
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1994

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Synovial Fluid
Cell Adhesion Molecules
Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Antigens
Endothelial Cells
Osteoarthritis
Macrophages
Endothelium
Leukocytes
Staining and Labeling
Cytokines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Differential distribution of intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, ICAM-2, and ICAM-3) and the MS-1 antigen in normal and diseased human synovia : Their possible pathogenetic and clinical significance in rheumatoid arthritis. / Szekanecz, Z.; Haines, G. Kenneth; Lin, Theodore R.; Harlow, Lisa A.; Goerdt, Sergij; Rayan, Ghazi; Koch, Alisa E.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 37, No. 2, 02.1994, p. 221-231.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective. Cellular adhesion and differentiation molecules (CAMs) may play a role in the recruitment and retention of inflammatory cells into rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue (RA ST). In order to determine if certain CAMs are up-regulated in RA ST compared with normal ST, we studied the distribution of intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) 1, 2, and 3 in ST. We also studied the MS-1 antigen since it is preferentially expressed on discontinuous endothelia, such as those found in RA ST; MS-1 is also expressed differentially upon cytokine activation of cells in vitro or in pathologic conditions in situ. Thus, we postulated a possible similarity between MS-1 and ICAM-1 expression in inflamed ST. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to determine the distribution of ICAMs and MS-1 in ST from 10 patients with RA, 10 with osteoarthritis (OA), and 4 normal individuals. Results. ICAM-1 expression was found on significantly more RA ST endothelial cells compared with normal cells, as well as on RA ST macrophages and lining cells. ICAM-2, also found on endothelial cells, showed no differential staining pattern. ICAM-3 was present on RA ST macrophages and lining cells as well as on some RA and OA endothelial cells. The MS-1 antigen was present on most RA and OA ST endothelia, lining cells, and macrophages. ICAM-1 expression and MS-1 expression in the lining layer were positively correlated in both RA and OA. Conclusion. ICAM-1, while found mainly on endothelial cells, is up-regulated on RA ST macrophages and lining cells, suggesting a role for these cells in the infiltration and tissue damage seen in the RA ST. ICAM-3, which is present mainly on normal resting leukocytes but not on normal endothelium, is expressed by some diseased ST leukocytes and endothelial cells. MS-1 is also found on the RA ST specialized, fenestrated endothelium, on macrophages, and in the lining layer. These results suggest that the differential expression of ICAMs and MS-1 in RA ST compared with normal ST might play a special role in the pathogenesis of RA.",
author = "Z. Szekanecz and Haines, {G. Kenneth} and Lin, {Theodore R.} and Harlow, {Lisa A.} and Sergij Goerdt and Ghazi Rayan and Koch, {Alisa E.}",
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T1 - Differential distribution of intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAM-1, ICAM-2, and ICAM-3) and the MS-1 antigen in normal and diseased human synovia

T2 - Their possible pathogenetic and clinical significance in rheumatoid arthritis

AU - Szekanecz, Z.

AU - Haines, G. Kenneth

AU - Lin, Theodore R.

AU - Harlow, Lisa A.

AU - Goerdt, Sergij

AU - Rayan, Ghazi

AU - Koch, Alisa E.

PY - 1994/2

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N2 - Objective. Cellular adhesion and differentiation molecules (CAMs) may play a role in the recruitment and retention of inflammatory cells into rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue (RA ST). In order to determine if certain CAMs are up-regulated in RA ST compared with normal ST, we studied the distribution of intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) 1, 2, and 3 in ST. We also studied the MS-1 antigen since it is preferentially expressed on discontinuous endothelia, such as those found in RA ST; MS-1 is also expressed differentially upon cytokine activation of cells in vitro or in pathologic conditions in situ. Thus, we postulated a possible similarity between MS-1 and ICAM-1 expression in inflamed ST. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to determine the distribution of ICAMs and MS-1 in ST from 10 patients with RA, 10 with osteoarthritis (OA), and 4 normal individuals. Results. ICAM-1 expression was found on significantly more RA ST endothelial cells compared with normal cells, as well as on RA ST macrophages and lining cells. ICAM-2, also found on endothelial cells, showed no differential staining pattern. ICAM-3 was present on RA ST macrophages and lining cells as well as on some RA and OA endothelial cells. The MS-1 antigen was present on most RA and OA ST endothelia, lining cells, and macrophages. ICAM-1 expression and MS-1 expression in the lining layer were positively correlated in both RA and OA. Conclusion. ICAM-1, while found mainly on endothelial cells, is up-regulated on RA ST macrophages and lining cells, suggesting a role for these cells in the infiltration and tissue damage seen in the RA ST. ICAM-3, which is present mainly on normal resting leukocytes but not on normal endothelium, is expressed by some diseased ST leukocytes and endothelial cells. MS-1 is also found on the RA ST specialized, fenestrated endothelium, on macrophages, and in the lining layer. These results suggest that the differential expression of ICAMs and MS-1 in RA ST compared with normal ST might play a special role in the pathogenesis of RA.

AB - Objective. Cellular adhesion and differentiation molecules (CAMs) may play a role in the recruitment and retention of inflammatory cells into rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue (RA ST). In order to determine if certain CAMs are up-regulated in RA ST compared with normal ST, we studied the distribution of intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) 1, 2, and 3 in ST. We also studied the MS-1 antigen since it is preferentially expressed on discontinuous endothelia, such as those found in RA ST; MS-1 is also expressed differentially upon cytokine activation of cells in vitro or in pathologic conditions in situ. Thus, we postulated a possible similarity between MS-1 and ICAM-1 expression in inflamed ST. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to determine the distribution of ICAMs and MS-1 in ST from 10 patients with RA, 10 with osteoarthritis (OA), and 4 normal individuals. Results. ICAM-1 expression was found on significantly more RA ST endothelial cells compared with normal cells, as well as on RA ST macrophages and lining cells. ICAM-2, also found on endothelial cells, showed no differential staining pattern. ICAM-3 was present on RA ST macrophages and lining cells as well as on some RA and OA endothelial cells. The MS-1 antigen was present on most RA and OA ST endothelia, lining cells, and macrophages. ICAM-1 expression and MS-1 expression in the lining layer were positively correlated in both RA and OA. Conclusion. ICAM-1, while found mainly on endothelial cells, is up-regulated on RA ST macrophages and lining cells, suggesting a role for these cells in the infiltration and tissue damage seen in the RA ST. ICAM-3, which is present mainly on normal resting leukocytes but not on normal endothelium, is expressed by some diseased ST leukocytes and endothelial cells. MS-1 is also found on the RA ST specialized, fenestrated endothelium, on macrophages, and in the lining layer. These results suggest that the differential expression of ICAMs and MS-1 in RA ST compared with normal ST might play a special role in the pathogenesis of RA.

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