Differences in action of topical and systemic cysteamine on gastric blood flow, gastric acid secretion and gastric ulceration in the rat

Ome Abdel-Salam, J. Szolcsányi, G. Mózsik

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of cysteamine on gastric blood flow and on the indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal damage was studied. In anesthetized rats, cysteamine (280 mg/kg) given subcutaneously (sc) decreased gastric blood flow measured by the laser Doppler flowmetry technique. In contrast, cysteamine (1-60 mg/ml) applied topically to the serosal surface of the stomach evoked a concentration-dependent and long-lasting increase in gastric blood flow. At 60 mg/ml, cysteamine increased blood flow by 166.8 ± 26.1% of predrug control value. Pretreatment with indomethacin (20 mg/kg, sc), intravenous (iv) atropine (1 mg/kg, propranolol (1 mg/kg, iv), combined H1 and H2-blockade or bilateral cervical vagotomy alone or combined with iv guanethidine (8 mg/kg), or pretreatment with the capsaicin analogue resiniferatoxin did not reduce the vasodilator response to cysteamine. The vasodilator response to topical capsaicin, was not reduced after sc cysteamine (280 mg/kg) pretreatment. In conscious pylorus-ligated rats, sc cysteamine (100 or 280 mg/kg) given simultaneously with indomethacin inhibited gastric acid output but had variable effects on the indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal damage. Cysteamine (100 or 280 mg/kg) administered sc 4 h prior to indomethacin enhanced gastric injury by sc indomethacin, but did not prevent the gastroprotective action of capsaicin. In contrast, orally administered cysteamine (60 mg/ml) reduced gastric injury induced by sc indomethacin plus intragastric HCl. These data provide the first evidence for the effect of cysteamine on gastric microcirculation in the rat and suggest a direct vasodilator effect for topical cysteamine. The microvascular effects of cysteamine are largely responsible for the different effects of this agent on experimental gastric injury.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)63-73
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Physiology Paris
Volume90
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Cysteamine
Gastric Acid
Stomach
Indomethacin
Capsaicin
Vasodilator Agents
Wounds and Injuries
Guanethidine
Laser-Doppler Flowmetry
Vagotomy
Pylorus
Microcirculation
Atropine
Propranolol

Keywords

  • Capsaicin
  • Cysteamine
  • Gastric microcirculation
  • Laser Doppler flowmetry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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title = "Differences in action of topical and systemic cysteamine on gastric blood flow, gastric acid secretion and gastric ulceration in the rat",
abstract = "The effect of cysteamine on gastric blood flow and on the indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal damage was studied. In anesthetized rats, cysteamine (280 mg/kg) given subcutaneously (sc) decreased gastric blood flow measured by the laser Doppler flowmetry technique. In contrast, cysteamine (1-60 mg/ml) applied topically to the serosal surface of the stomach evoked a concentration-dependent and long-lasting increase in gastric blood flow. At 60 mg/ml, cysteamine increased blood flow by 166.8 ± 26.1{\%} of predrug control value. Pretreatment with indomethacin (20 mg/kg, sc), intravenous (iv) atropine (1 mg/kg, propranolol (1 mg/kg, iv), combined H1 and H2-blockade or bilateral cervical vagotomy alone or combined with iv guanethidine (8 mg/kg), or pretreatment with the capsaicin analogue resiniferatoxin did not reduce the vasodilator response to cysteamine. The vasodilator response to topical capsaicin, was not reduced after sc cysteamine (280 mg/kg) pretreatment. In conscious pylorus-ligated rats, sc cysteamine (100 or 280 mg/kg) given simultaneously with indomethacin inhibited gastric acid output but had variable effects on the indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal damage. Cysteamine (100 or 280 mg/kg) administered sc 4 h prior to indomethacin enhanced gastric injury by sc indomethacin, but did not prevent the gastroprotective action of capsaicin. In contrast, orally administered cysteamine (60 mg/ml) reduced gastric injury induced by sc indomethacin plus intragastric HCl. These data provide the first evidence for the effect of cysteamine on gastric microcirculation in the rat and suggest a direct vasodilator effect for topical cysteamine. The microvascular effects of cysteamine are largely responsible for the different effects of this agent on experimental gastric injury.",
keywords = "Capsaicin, Cysteamine, Gastric microcirculation, Laser Doppler flowmetry",
author = "Ome Abdel-Salam and J. Szolcs{\'a}nyi and G. M{\'o}zsik",
year = "1996",
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AU - Szolcsányi, J.

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N2 - The effect of cysteamine on gastric blood flow and on the indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal damage was studied. In anesthetized rats, cysteamine (280 mg/kg) given subcutaneously (sc) decreased gastric blood flow measured by the laser Doppler flowmetry technique. In contrast, cysteamine (1-60 mg/ml) applied topically to the serosal surface of the stomach evoked a concentration-dependent and long-lasting increase in gastric blood flow. At 60 mg/ml, cysteamine increased blood flow by 166.8 ± 26.1% of predrug control value. Pretreatment with indomethacin (20 mg/kg, sc), intravenous (iv) atropine (1 mg/kg, propranolol (1 mg/kg, iv), combined H1 and H2-blockade or bilateral cervical vagotomy alone or combined with iv guanethidine (8 mg/kg), or pretreatment with the capsaicin analogue resiniferatoxin did not reduce the vasodilator response to cysteamine. The vasodilator response to topical capsaicin, was not reduced after sc cysteamine (280 mg/kg) pretreatment. In conscious pylorus-ligated rats, sc cysteamine (100 or 280 mg/kg) given simultaneously with indomethacin inhibited gastric acid output but had variable effects on the indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal damage. Cysteamine (100 or 280 mg/kg) administered sc 4 h prior to indomethacin enhanced gastric injury by sc indomethacin, but did not prevent the gastroprotective action of capsaicin. In contrast, orally administered cysteamine (60 mg/ml) reduced gastric injury induced by sc indomethacin plus intragastric HCl. These data provide the first evidence for the effect of cysteamine on gastric microcirculation in the rat and suggest a direct vasodilator effect for topical cysteamine. The microvascular effects of cysteamine are largely responsible for the different effects of this agent on experimental gastric injury.

AB - The effect of cysteamine on gastric blood flow and on the indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal damage was studied. In anesthetized rats, cysteamine (280 mg/kg) given subcutaneously (sc) decreased gastric blood flow measured by the laser Doppler flowmetry technique. In contrast, cysteamine (1-60 mg/ml) applied topically to the serosal surface of the stomach evoked a concentration-dependent and long-lasting increase in gastric blood flow. At 60 mg/ml, cysteamine increased blood flow by 166.8 ± 26.1% of predrug control value. Pretreatment with indomethacin (20 mg/kg, sc), intravenous (iv) atropine (1 mg/kg, propranolol (1 mg/kg, iv), combined H1 and H2-blockade or bilateral cervical vagotomy alone or combined with iv guanethidine (8 mg/kg), or pretreatment with the capsaicin analogue resiniferatoxin did not reduce the vasodilator response to cysteamine. The vasodilator response to topical capsaicin, was not reduced after sc cysteamine (280 mg/kg) pretreatment. In conscious pylorus-ligated rats, sc cysteamine (100 or 280 mg/kg) given simultaneously with indomethacin inhibited gastric acid output but had variable effects on the indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal damage. Cysteamine (100 or 280 mg/kg) administered sc 4 h prior to indomethacin enhanced gastric injury by sc indomethacin, but did not prevent the gastroprotective action of capsaicin. In contrast, orally administered cysteamine (60 mg/ml) reduced gastric injury induced by sc indomethacin plus intragastric HCl. These data provide the first evidence for the effect of cysteamine on gastric microcirculation in the rat and suggest a direct vasodilator effect for topical cysteamine. The microvascular effects of cysteamine are largely responsible for the different effects of this agent on experimental gastric injury.

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