A kutyák eizáródásos epehólyag- és epeúti betegségeinek kórjelzése gyógykezelése

Translated title of the contribution: Diagnosis and treatment of obstructive gallbladder and biliary diseases in dogs

K. Vörös, Németh Tibor, Vrabély Tamás, Manczur Ferenc, Tóth József, Papp László, Biksi Imre, Perge Edina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A retrospective work was done to study the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of obstructive gallbladder and biliary tract diseases in 18 dogs with special regard to ultrasonography and surgical treatment. The following criteria served for indication of diagnostic ultrasonography: icterus, hepatomegaly, palpable abnormal mass in the epigastric or mesogastric region, free peritoneal fluid accumulation, as well as hyperbilirubinaemia, and elevated activities of aspartate transferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT) or alkaline phosphatase (AP) in the serum. Hepatic and gallbladder ultrasonography (Figure 2) was performed with a Brüel and Kjaer 1846 ultrasound system, using 5.0, 6.0 or 7.0 MHz real-time mechanical sector transducers and a Panther 2002 ultrasound machine with 5.0 and 6.5 MHz convex array transducers (Brüel and Kjaer, Naerum, Denmark) depending on the size of the patients. Abdominocentesis was performed in 5 dogs demonstrating signs of peritoneal effusion during physical and ultrasound examination. The gallbladder was removed via anterograde cholecystectomy (Figure 1) during biliary surgery, and intensive postoperative care was provided to treat the complications of bacterial inflammation and bile peritonitis. Most common findings indicating hepatobiliary disease included icterus (Figure 3), hepatomegaly, intraabdominal (epigastric) masses, and abdominal distension due to bile accumulation (Figures 4 and 5). Useful information was gained by ultrasonography, regarding the alterations of the hepatobiliary system in all dogs. Laparatomy was correctly indicated in all cases, and in 15 dogs ultrasound diagnoses corresponded well with intraoperative findings (Table). In 3 dogs, obstructive biliary tract disorder was correctly estimated, but the final diagnosis was not equal with the surgical and morphological results in all respects. The following ultrasonographic diagnoses were established compared to surgical findings: gallbladder obstruction caused by bile sludge (correct/total: 2/3, surgical diagnosis: choleliths in one case), gallbladder obstruction caused by neoplasm (0/1, surgical diagnosis: mucocele), gallbladder and extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction due to choleliths (5/5), extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction caused by pancreatic mass (3/3), extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction by unidentified cause (0/1, morphological diagnosis: chronic pancreatitis). Bile peritonitis caused by gallbladder rupture (5/5) was correctly diagnosed by ultrasound, aided with ultrasonographically-guided abdominocentesis and peritoneal fluid analysis. Surgical treatment of a biliary tract disease should be considered in the presence of one or more ultrasonographic criteria: (1.) rupture of the gallbladder is suspected by the presence of a small gallbladder filled up with thick, echogenic content (Figure 6) and identification of free abdominal fluid; (2.) extremely dilated gallbladder, especially with intraluminal signs of stones (Figure 7) or thick bile at the neck of the gallbladder; (3.) dilated gallbladder with dilatation of the intra- and extrahepatic biliary tract. Early diagnosis based on ultrasonographic findings and emergency surgical treatment (Figure 8, 9 and 10) is inevitable in most cases of obstructive gallbladder and biliary tract diseases. A further diagnostic aid can be expected from ultrasonographic gallbladder volume measurements using cholagogue substances to differentiate between complete and partial obstructions, as well as cases for conservative or surgical treatment.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)479-490
Number of pages12
JournalMagyar Allatorvosok Lapja
Volume124
Issue number8
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Fingerprint

Gallbladder Diseases
dog diseases
gall bladder
Gallbladder
Dogs
biliary tract
intestinal obstruction
Biliary Tract
bile
biliary tract diseases
Bile
Biliary Tract Diseases
ultrasonography
Therapeutics
Ascitic Fluid
Ultrasonography
dogs
jaundice
Hepatomegaly
peritonitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Vörös, K., Tibor, N., Tamás, V., Ferenc, M., József, T., László, P., ... Edina, P. (2002). A kutyák eizáródásos epehólyag- és epeúti betegségeinek kórjelzése gyógykezelése. Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja, 124(8), 479-490.

A kutyák eizáródásos epehólyag- és epeúti betegségeinek kórjelzése gyógykezelése. / Vörös, K.; Tibor, Németh; Tamás, Vrabély; Ferenc, Manczur; József, Tóth; László, Papp; Imre, Biksi; Edina, Perge.

In: Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja, Vol. 124, No. 8, 2002, p. 479-490.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vörös, K, Tibor, N, Tamás, V, Ferenc, M, József, T, László, P, Imre, B & Edina, P 2002, 'A kutyák eizáródásos epehólyag- és epeúti betegségeinek kórjelzése gyógykezelése', Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja, vol. 124, no. 8, pp. 479-490.
Vörös K, Tibor N, Tamás V, Ferenc M, József T, László P et al. A kutyák eizáródásos epehólyag- és epeúti betegségeinek kórjelzése gyógykezelése. Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja. 2002;124(8):479-490.
Vörös, K. ; Tibor, Németh ; Tamás, Vrabély ; Ferenc, Manczur ; József, Tóth ; László, Papp ; Imre, Biksi ; Edina, Perge. / A kutyák eizáródásos epehólyag- és epeúti betegségeinek kórjelzése gyógykezelése. In: Magyar Allatorvosok Lapja. 2002 ; Vol. 124, No. 8. pp. 479-490.
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AU - Vörös, K.

AU - Tibor, Németh

AU - Tamás, Vrabély

AU - Ferenc, Manczur

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