Development of depression profile: A new psychometric instrument to selectively evaluate depressive symptoms based on the neurocircuitry theory

G. Faludi, X. Gonda, Edit Kliment, Vera Bekes, Veronika Meszaros, Attila Olah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although we have several self-report instruments available to assess depression, they yield a composite score and thus do not allow for the differential examination of major symptom clusters associated with depression. However, such an instrument would be a useful tool in subtyping depression and selecting the most appropriate pharmacotherapy for each patient. The neurocircuitry theory describes the biochemical and neuroanatomic background associated with the major symptoms of depression. Based on the neurocircuitry theory, our team has developed a new instrument, the Depression Profile, to selectively assess depressive symptom clusters associated with different neurotransmitter systems and neuroanatomic structures. The aim of our study was to investigate the psychometric characteristics of Depression Profile. Methods: 339 patients consecutively admitted with DSM-IV major depression in our hospital completed the Depression Profile in the first two weeks of their hospitalisation. 81 patients in an adult outpatient unit also completed the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale. Internal consistency of Depression Profile was tested with item analysis. The external validity of Depression Profile against the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale was tested using Pearson correlations. Results: The internal consistency of Depression Profile proved to be excellent. The Cronbach alpha values of the scales met the expectable minimum level derived from the number of items in the scales. In testing for convergent validity, all Pearson correlation coefficients between Depression profile subscales and the Zung Self-rating Depression Scale were significant and moderate to high which indicates the good external validity of our instrument. Discussion: The initial psychometric evaluation of Depression Profile indicates that our instrument has good reliability and internal and external validity. The instrument also proved to be useful in clinical work to aid the choice of medications and determine the subtype of depressive episodes. Further studies, possibly with biochemical and neuroimaging methodology are needed to validate the 9 main symptom clusters of the Depression Profile subscales with respect to their neuroanatomical and neurochemical bases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)337-345
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropsychopharmacologia Hungarica
Volume12
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

Fingerprint

Psychometrics
Depression
Neuroimaging
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Self Report
Neurotransmitter Agents

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Depressive symptoms
  • Neurocircuitry theory
  • Psychometric validation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Development of depression profile : A new psychometric instrument to selectively evaluate depressive symptoms based on the neurocircuitry theory. / Faludi, G.; Gonda, X.; Kliment, Edit; Bekes, Vera; Meszaros, Veronika; Olah, Attila.

In: Neuropsychopharmacologia Hungarica, Vol. 12, No. 2, 06.2010, p. 337-345.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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