Determining the effect of different environmental conditions on Ebola virus viability in clinically relevant specimens article

Bernadett Palyi, Nora Magyar, Judit Henczko, Balint Szalai, Agnes Farkas, Thomas Strecker, M. Takács, Zoltan Kis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2013-2016, West Africa experienced the largest and longest Ebola virus disease outbreak ever documented. The wide geographic spread and magnitude of the outbreak often limited the timely and rapid testing of diagnostic samples from patients with suspected Ebola virus disease, raising questions regarding the optimal storage and shipping conditions of clinically relevant specimens, including EDTA-whole blood, plasma, capillary blood, urine and seminal fluid (associated with sexual transmission of the Ebola virus after recovery from the disease). Therefore, the aim of our study was to identify the extent to which storage temperature and clinical specimen type influence Ebola virus viability. Virus infectivity was determined using a fluorescent focus-forming assay. In our study, we show that Ebola virus was the most stable in EDTA-whole blood and plasma samples, whereas rapid decay of infectivity was observed in simulated capillary blood, urine and semen samples, especially when these samples were stored at higher temperatures. The analysis of variance results demonstrated that both temperature and clinical specimen type have significant effects on virus viability, whereas donor differences were not observed. Repeated freeze and thaw cycles of the samples also had a notable impact on virus viability in EDTA-whole blood and urine. Due to the rapid temperature- and specimen-dependent degradation of the virus observed here, our study highlights the importance of proper clinical sample storage at low temperatures during transportation and laboratory analysis.

Original languageEnglish
Article number52
JournalEmerging Microbes and Infections
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 1 2018

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Ebolavirus
Microbial Viability
Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever
Temperature
Edetic Acid
Urine
Disease Outbreaks
Viruses
Western Africa
Semen
Analysis of Variance
Tissue Donors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Parasitology
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Drug Discovery
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Determining the effect of different environmental conditions on Ebola virus viability in clinically relevant specimens article. / Palyi, Bernadett; Magyar, Nora; Henczko, Judit; Szalai, Balint; Farkas, Agnes; Strecker, Thomas; Takács, M.; Kis, Zoltan.

In: Emerging Microbes and Infections, Vol. 7, No. 1, 52, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Palyi, Bernadett ; Magyar, Nora ; Henczko, Judit ; Szalai, Balint ; Farkas, Agnes ; Strecker, Thomas ; Takács, M. ; Kis, Zoltan. / Determining the effect of different environmental conditions on Ebola virus viability in clinically relevant specimens article. In: Emerging Microbes and Infections. 2018 ; Vol. 7, No. 1.
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