Determination of trace elements in human liver biopsy samples by ICP-MS and TXRF: Hepatic steatosis and nickel accumulation

Imre Varga, Ágnes Szebeni, N. Szoboszlai, B. Kovács

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33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human liver biopsy samples, collected from 52 individuals, were analysed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry in a retrospective study (i.e. patient selection and liver biopsy were not for the purpose of element analysis). The freeze-dried samples (typically 0.5-2 mg dry weight) were digested in a laboratory microwave digestion system and solutions with a final volume of 1 mL were prepared. The concentrations of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, and Pb were determined by use of a Thermo Elemental X7 ICP-MS spectrometer. TXRF measurements were performed with an Atomika Extra IIA spectrometer. Yttrium was employed as an internal standard, prepared by dissolution of 5N-purity yttria (Y2O3) in our laboratory. The accuracy was tested by analysis of NIST 1577a Bovine Liver certified reference material. The concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Rb determined in human liver biopsy samples were in good agreement with data published by other authors. The distribution of nickel in the samples was surprisingly uneven-nickel concentrations ranged from 0.7 to 12 μg g-1 (dry weight) in 38 samples and in several samples were extremely high, 36-693 μg g-1. Analysis of replicate procedural blanks and control measurements were performed to prevent misinterpretation of the data. For patients with steatosis (n=14) Ni concentrations were consistently high except for two who had levels close to those measured for the normal group. As far as we are aware no previous literature data are available on the association of steatosis with high concentration of nickel in human liver biopsies taken from living patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)476-482
Number of pages7
JournalAnalytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
Volume383
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry
Biopsy
Trace Elements
Nickel
Liver
Mass Spectrometry
Fluorescence
X-Rays
X rays
Spectrometers
X-Ray Emission Spectrometry
Yttrium
Weights and Measures
Microwaves
Patient Selection
Digestion
Dissolution
Retrospective Studies

Keywords

  • Hepatic steatosis
  • Human liver biopsy
  • ICP-mass spectrometry
  • Nickel
  • X-ray fluorescence analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

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title = "Determination of trace elements in human liver biopsy samples by ICP-MS and TXRF: Hepatic steatosis and nickel accumulation",
abstract = "Human liver biopsy samples, collected from 52 individuals, were analysed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry in a retrospective study (i.e. patient selection and liver biopsy were not for the purpose of element analysis). The freeze-dried samples (typically 0.5-2 mg dry weight) were digested in a laboratory microwave digestion system and solutions with a final volume of 1 mL were prepared. The concentrations of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, and Pb were determined by use of a Thermo Elemental X7 ICP-MS spectrometer. TXRF measurements were performed with an Atomika Extra IIA spectrometer. Yttrium was employed as an internal standard, prepared by dissolution of 5N-purity yttria (Y2O3) in our laboratory. The accuracy was tested by analysis of NIST 1577a Bovine Liver certified reference material. The concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Rb determined in human liver biopsy samples were in good agreement with data published by other authors. The distribution of nickel in the samples was surprisingly uneven-nickel concentrations ranged from 0.7 to 12 μg g-1 (dry weight) in 38 samples and in several samples were extremely high, 36-693 μg g-1. Analysis of replicate procedural blanks and control measurements were performed to prevent misinterpretation of the data. For patients with steatosis (n=14) Ni concentrations were consistently high except for two who had levels close to those measured for the normal group. As far as we are aware no previous literature data are available on the association of steatosis with high concentration of nickel in human liver biopsies taken from living patients.",
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T1 - Determination of trace elements in human liver biopsy samples by ICP-MS and TXRF

T2 - Hepatic steatosis and nickel accumulation

AU - Varga, Imre

AU - Szebeni, Ágnes

AU - Szoboszlai, N.

AU - Kovács, B.

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N2 - Human liver biopsy samples, collected from 52 individuals, were analysed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry in a retrospective study (i.e. patient selection and liver biopsy were not for the purpose of element analysis). The freeze-dried samples (typically 0.5-2 mg dry weight) were digested in a laboratory microwave digestion system and solutions with a final volume of 1 mL were prepared. The concentrations of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, and Pb were determined by use of a Thermo Elemental X7 ICP-MS spectrometer. TXRF measurements were performed with an Atomika Extra IIA spectrometer. Yttrium was employed as an internal standard, prepared by dissolution of 5N-purity yttria (Y2O3) in our laboratory. The accuracy was tested by analysis of NIST 1577a Bovine Liver certified reference material. The concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Rb determined in human liver biopsy samples were in good agreement with data published by other authors. The distribution of nickel in the samples was surprisingly uneven-nickel concentrations ranged from 0.7 to 12 μg g-1 (dry weight) in 38 samples and in several samples were extremely high, 36-693 μg g-1. Analysis of replicate procedural blanks and control measurements were performed to prevent misinterpretation of the data. For patients with steatosis (n=14) Ni concentrations were consistently high except for two who had levels close to those measured for the normal group. As far as we are aware no previous literature data are available on the association of steatosis with high concentration of nickel in human liver biopsies taken from living patients.

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