Determination of the geographical origin of green coffee by principal component analysis of carbon, nitrogen and boron stable isotope ratios

Francesca Serra, Claude G. Guillou, Fabiano Reniero, Luciano Ballarin, Maria I. Cantagallo, Michael Wieser, Sundaram S. Iyer, K. Heberger, Frank Vanhaecke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study we show that the continental origin of coffee can be inferred on the basis of coupling the isotope ratios of several elements determined in green beans. The combination of the isotopic fingerprints of carbon, nitrogen and boron, used as integrated proxies for environmental conditions and agricultural practices, allows discrimination among the three continental areas producing coffee (Africa, Asia and America). In these continents there are countries producing 'specialty coffees', highly rated on the market that are sometimes mislabeled further on along the export-sale chain or mixed with cheaper coffees produced in other regions. By means of principal component analysis we were successful in identifying the continental origin of 88% of the samples analyzed. An intracontinent discrimination has not been possible at this stage of the study, but is planned in future work. Nonetheless, the approach using stable isotope ratios seems quite promising, and future development of this research is also discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2111-2115
Number of pages5
JournalRapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry
Volume19
Issue number15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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Coffee
Boron
Isotopes
Principal component analysis
Nitrogen
Carbon
Sales

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Spectroscopy

Cite this

Determination of the geographical origin of green coffee by principal component analysis of carbon, nitrogen and boron stable isotope ratios. / Serra, Francesca; Guillou, Claude G.; Reniero, Fabiano; Ballarin, Luciano; Cantagallo, Maria I.; Wieser, Michael; Iyer, Sundaram S.; Heberger, K.; Vanhaecke, Frank.

In: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry, Vol. 19, No. 15, 2005, p. 2111-2115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Serra, Francesca ; Guillou, Claude G. ; Reniero, Fabiano ; Ballarin, Luciano ; Cantagallo, Maria I. ; Wieser, Michael ; Iyer, Sundaram S. ; Heberger, K. ; Vanhaecke, Frank. / Determination of the geographical origin of green coffee by principal component analysis of carbon, nitrogen and boron stable isotope ratios. In: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry. 2005 ; Vol. 19, No. 15. pp. 2111-2115.
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