Determinants of disability in everyday activities differ in primary and cervicogenic headaches and in low back pain

Gyöngyi Gesztelyi, Dániel Bereczki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to test whether the association between disability and depressive symptoms in patients with cervicogenic headache is similar to that found in primary headaches or to the pattern found in low back pain. During a 2-year period, 716 consecutive patients with the clinical diagnosis of cervicogenic headache (n = 182), low back pain (n = 116), migraine (n = 231), tension-type headache (n = 176), and cluster headache (n = 11) filled in the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Disability was scored by the migraine disability score questionnaire reflecting the number of days with lost or decreased work, household and social activities. Non-parametric tests and multiple general regression were used for statistical analysis. In multivariate testing, significant independent determinants of disability were pain frequency, pain intensity and the severity of depressive symptoms in migraine and tension-type headache; pain frequency and the BDI score in cervicogenic headache, and pain frequency alone in low back pain. Disability is related to pain frequency in all pain syndromes evaluated in the present study. The level of disability is associated with the severity of pain only in primary headaches, but not in pain syndromes of vertebral origin (cervicogenic headache and low back pain). Disability is associated with the severity of depressive symptoms in all headache types but not in low back pain. Both the location and the etiology of pain have importance in determining the interrelationship between pain characteristics, depression and disability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)271-276
Number of pages6
JournalPsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Volume60
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2006

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Disability
  • Headache
  • Low back pain
  • Pain location

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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