Detection of TT virus in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies

Peter Gergely, Antal Blazsek, Katalin Dankó, Andrea Ponyi, Gyula Poór

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The TT virus, a recently identified single-stranded DNA virus with unknown pathogenicity, has been shown to commonly infect humans. Viruses have been considered to contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmune disorders including idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We assessed the prevalence of TTV infection in IIM compared with that in patients with RA and healthy blood donors. Detection of TTV was conducted by nested PCR and real-time PCR in the sera of 94 patients with IIM, 95 RA patients, and 95 age- and sex-matched healthy blood donors. Identity of the PCR products was confirmed by sequencing. TTV DNA was detected in 61 of 94 (64.9%) patients with IIM, in 64 of 95 (67.4%) patients with RA, and in 62 of 95 (65.3%; P > 0.05) healthy individuals. Age, sex, activity, or duration of disease had no influence on TTV positivity in either group. However, patients with severe IIM (n = 36) had a significantly higher rate of TTV infection (31/36, 86.1%) than patients with mild disease (30/58, 51.7%, P <0.05, χ2 = 10.0). Disease was considered severe in IIM when immunosuppressive treatment was necessary because of continuous high activity and/or serious inner-organ involvement despite corticosteroid treatment. In conclusion, although we found the detection rate of TTV similar in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies and rheumatoid arthritis and comparable to that in healthy controls, our data suggest that infection with TT virus may result in a more severe disease in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)304-313
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1050
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Torque teno virus
Myositis
Viruses
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Blood
Single-Stranded DNA
Blood Donors
Immunosuppressive Agents
Infection
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Virus
Polymerase Chain Reaction
DNA Viruses
DNA
Virulence
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords

  • Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies
  • Myositis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • TT virus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Detection of TT virus in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. / Gergely, Peter; Blazsek, Antal; Dankó, Katalin; Ponyi, Andrea; Poór, Gyula.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1050, 2005, p. 304-313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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