Design of active suspension system for road vehicles. An eigenstructure assignment approach

P. Michelberger, J. Bokor, A. Keresztes, P. Várlaki

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is known that road vehicle suspension systems have to satisfy conflicting design requirements. For ride comfort the suspension should isolate the body from high frequency road surface excitation. On the other hand, requirements on handling ability imply that at lower frequencies the body and the wheel should closely follow the vertical inputs due to the road surface. In addition, the suspension has to control body motion due to changes in payload, forces from braking, curving and also in serodynamic forces. The compromise among these design requirements can significantly be achieved by application of active elements in the suspension systems, since active suspensions can remove some inherent restrictions posessed by passive systems. In the design of active suspensions the vehicle and suspension systems are usually described by a system of linear differential equations that can be converted to state-space form. The control input to this dynamic model is provided by some actuators e.g. servovalves and the hydraulic cylinders, and the disturbance input is the road surface excitation. Using this modelling concept, the active system is realised by variations of linear state variable feedback. The results published in the literature differ in the complexity of state-space model describing the body and the suspension system of the vehicle, and also on choosing a particular observer configuration and state feedback law. This paper discusses the active suspension system design from an eigenstructure assignment viewpoint. The effect of changes in the design parameters will be illustrated by computer simulations.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - Society of Automotive Engineers
Editors Anon
PublisherPubl by SAE
Pages213-218
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 1990
EventEighteenth FISITA Congress - The Promise of New Technology in the Automotive Industry - Torino, Italy
Duration: May 7 1990May 11 1990

Other

OtherEighteenth FISITA Congress - The Promise of New Technology in the Automotive Industry
CityTorino, Italy
Period5/7/905/11/90

Fingerprint

Active suspension systems
Vehicle suspensions
Braking
State feedback
Dynamic models
Wheels
Differential equations
Actuators
Systems analysis
Hydraulics
Feedback
Computer simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Michelberger, P., Bokor, J., Keresztes, A., & Várlaki, P. (1990). Design of active suspension system for road vehicles. An eigenstructure assignment approach. In Anon (Ed.), Proceedings - Society of Automotive Engineers (pp. 213-218). Publ by SAE.

Design of active suspension system for road vehicles. An eigenstructure assignment approach. / Michelberger, P.; Bokor, J.; Keresztes, A.; Várlaki, P.

Proceedings - Society of Automotive Engineers. ed. / Anon. Publ by SAE, 1990. p. 213-218.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Michelberger, P, Bokor, J, Keresztes, A & Várlaki, P 1990, Design of active suspension system for road vehicles. An eigenstructure assignment approach. in Anon (ed.), Proceedings - Society of Automotive Engineers. Publ by SAE, pp. 213-218, Eighteenth FISITA Congress - The Promise of New Technology in the Automotive Industry, Torino, Italy, 5/7/90.
Michelberger P, Bokor J, Keresztes A, Várlaki P. Design of active suspension system for road vehicles. An eigenstructure assignment approach. In Anon, editor, Proceedings - Society of Automotive Engineers. Publ by SAE. 1990. p. 213-218
Michelberger, P. ; Bokor, J. ; Keresztes, A. ; Várlaki, P. / Design of active suspension system for road vehicles. An eigenstructure assignment approach. Proceedings - Society of Automotive Engineers. editor / Anon. Publ by SAE, 1990. pp. 213-218
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