Depressive symptomatology and vital exhaustion are differentially related to behavioral risk factors for coronary artery disease

M. Kopp, Paul R J Falger, Ad Appels, Sándor Szedmák

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

153 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study proposes to assess the differences of two psychosocial risk indicators for coronary artery disease (CAD), ie, depressive symptoms and vital exhaustion. Method: In a representative, stratified, nation-wide sample of the population of Hungary over the age of 16 years (N = 12,640), analyses were made of whether those risk indicators were differentially related to several illness behaviors (including history of cardiovascular treatment and cardiovascular sick days), cognitions, mood states, and socioeconomic characteristics that may generally be associated with increased CAD risk. The sample was stratified by age, sex, and composition of the population of all counties in Hungary. Results: Although depressive symptoms and vital exhaustion correlated strongly, there were clear and significant differences in strength of association between depressive symptoms, vital exhaustion and several variables under study. Dysfunctional cognitions, hostility, lack of purpose in life, low perceived self-efficacy, illegal drug use, alcohol and drug abuse, several forms of subjective disability complaints and history of treatment because of congenital disorders, and chronic skin and hematological disorders were more often associated with depressive symptoms, whereas loss of energy, use of stimulants, chest-pain-related disabilities, history of treatment because of cardiovascular disorders, and self-reported cardiovascular sick days were significantly more often associated with vital exhaustion. Conclusions: Vital exhaustion and depressive symptomatology are differentially associated with relevant external criteria. Vital exhaustion is associated with perceived cardiovascular complaints and history of cardiovascular treatment, whereas depressive symptomatology seems to be more closely connected to disabilities and complaints related to alcohol, drug, and congenital-disorder, and to dysfunctional cognitions and hostility.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)752-758
Number of pages7
JournalPsychosomatic Medicine
Volume60
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1998

Fingerprint

Coronary Artery Disease
Depression
Cognition
Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities
Sick Leave
Hostility
Hungary
Illness Behavior
Self Efficacy
Therapeutics
Chest Pain
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Population
Alcoholism
Substance-Related Disorders
Alcohols
Skin

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular morbidity
  • Depressive symptomatology
  • Vital exhaustion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Depressive symptomatology and vital exhaustion are differentially related to behavioral risk factors for coronary artery disease. / Kopp, M.; Falger, Paul R J; Appels, Ad; Szedmák, Sándor.

In: Psychosomatic Medicine, Vol. 60, No. 6, 11.1998, p. 752-758.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c6e5a2c7026d4068b1881f3da6347c5e,
title = "Depressive symptomatology and vital exhaustion are differentially related to behavioral risk factors for coronary artery disease",
abstract = "Objective: This study proposes to assess the differences of two psychosocial risk indicators for coronary artery disease (CAD), ie, depressive symptoms and vital exhaustion. Method: In a representative, stratified, nation-wide sample of the population of Hungary over the age of 16 years (N = 12,640), analyses were made of whether those risk indicators were differentially related to several illness behaviors (including history of cardiovascular treatment and cardiovascular sick days), cognitions, mood states, and socioeconomic characteristics that may generally be associated with increased CAD risk. The sample was stratified by age, sex, and composition of the population of all counties in Hungary. Results: Although depressive symptoms and vital exhaustion correlated strongly, there were clear and significant differences in strength of association between depressive symptoms, vital exhaustion and several variables under study. Dysfunctional cognitions, hostility, lack of purpose in life, low perceived self-efficacy, illegal drug use, alcohol and drug abuse, several forms of subjective disability complaints and history of treatment because of congenital disorders, and chronic skin and hematological disorders were more often associated with depressive symptoms, whereas loss of energy, use of stimulants, chest-pain-related disabilities, history of treatment because of cardiovascular disorders, and self-reported cardiovascular sick days were significantly more often associated with vital exhaustion. Conclusions: Vital exhaustion and depressive symptomatology are differentially associated with relevant external criteria. Vital exhaustion is associated with perceived cardiovascular complaints and history of cardiovascular treatment, whereas depressive symptomatology seems to be more closely connected to disabilities and complaints related to alcohol, drug, and congenital-disorder, and to dysfunctional cognitions and hostility.",
keywords = "Cardiovascular morbidity, Depressive symptomatology, Vital exhaustion",
author = "M. Kopp and Falger, {Paul R J} and Ad Appels and S{\'a}ndor Szedm{\'a}k",
year = "1998",
month = "11",
language = "English",
volume = "60",
pages = "752--758",
journal = "Psychosomatic Medicine",
issn = "0033-3174",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Depressive symptomatology and vital exhaustion are differentially related to behavioral risk factors for coronary artery disease

AU - Kopp, M.

AU - Falger, Paul R J

AU - Appels, Ad

AU - Szedmák, Sándor

PY - 1998/11

Y1 - 1998/11

N2 - Objective: This study proposes to assess the differences of two psychosocial risk indicators for coronary artery disease (CAD), ie, depressive symptoms and vital exhaustion. Method: In a representative, stratified, nation-wide sample of the population of Hungary over the age of 16 years (N = 12,640), analyses were made of whether those risk indicators were differentially related to several illness behaviors (including history of cardiovascular treatment and cardiovascular sick days), cognitions, mood states, and socioeconomic characteristics that may generally be associated with increased CAD risk. The sample was stratified by age, sex, and composition of the population of all counties in Hungary. Results: Although depressive symptoms and vital exhaustion correlated strongly, there were clear and significant differences in strength of association between depressive symptoms, vital exhaustion and several variables under study. Dysfunctional cognitions, hostility, lack of purpose in life, low perceived self-efficacy, illegal drug use, alcohol and drug abuse, several forms of subjective disability complaints and history of treatment because of congenital disorders, and chronic skin and hematological disorders were more often associated with depressive symptoms, whereas loss of energy, use of stimulants, chest-pain-related disabilities, history of treatment because of cardiovascular disorders, and self-reported cardiovascular sick days were significantly more often associated with vital exhaustion. Conclusions: Vital exhaustion and depressive symptomatology are differentially associated with relevant external criteria. Vital exhaustion is associated with perceived cardiovascular complaints and history of cardiovascular treatment, whereas depressive symptomatology seems to be more closely connected to disabilities and complaints related to alcohol, drug, and congenital-disorder, and to dysfunctional cognitions and hostility.

AB - Objective: This study proposes to assess the differences of two psychosocial risk indicators for coronary artery disease (CAD), ie, depressive symptoms and vital exhaustion. Method: In a representative, stratified, nation-wide sample of the population of Hungary over the age of 16 years (N = 12,640), analyses were made of whether those risk indicators were differentially related to several illness behaviors (including history of cardiovascular treatment and cardiovascular sick days), cognitions, mood states, and socioeconomic characteristics that may generally be associated with increased CAD risk. The sample was stratified by age, sex, and composition of the population of all counties in Hungary. Results: Although depressive symptoms and vital exhaustion correlated strongly, there were clear and significant differences in strength of association between depressive symptoms, vital exhaustion and several variables under study. Dysfunctional cognitions, hostility, lack of purpose in life, low perceived self-efficacy, illegal drug use, alcohol and drug abuse, several forms of subjective disability complaints and history of treatment because of congenital disorders, and chronic skin and hematological disorders were more often associated with depressive symptoms, whereas loss of energy, use of stimulants, chest-pain-related disabilities, history of treatment because of cardiovascular disorders, and self-reported cardiovascular sick days were significantly more often associated with vital exhaustion. Conclusions: Vital exhaustion and depressive symptomatology are differentially associated with relevant external criteria. Vital exhaustion is associated with perceived cardiovascular complaints and history of cardiovascular treatment, whereas depressive symptomatology seems to be more closely connected to disabilities and complaints related to alcohol, drug, and congenital-disorder, and to dysfunctional cognitions and hostility.

KW - Cardiovascular morbidity

KW - Depressive symptomatology

KW - Vital exhaustion

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031725150&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031725150&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 60

SP - 752

EP - 758

JO - Psychosomatic Medicine

JF - Psychosomatic Medicine

SN - 0033-3174

IS - 6

ER -