A depresszió mint kronobiológiai betegség

Translated title of the contribution: Depression as chronobiological illness

J. Kálmán, Sára Kálmán

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chronobiological problems are always present as aetiological or pathoplastic conditions almost in all psychiatric disorders and considered as the greatest contributors to the mood and sleep disorders associated problems. The present review summarise the recent advances in the chronobiology research from the point of the clinician with particular emphasis on the psychobiology and pharmacotherapy of the depression. Human behaviour builds up from different length of circadian, ultradian and seasonal rhytms, strictly controlled by a hierarchical organisation of subcellullar, cellular, neuro-humoral and neuro-immunological clock systems. These internal clock systems are orchestrated at molecular level by certain clock genes and on the other hand - at neuro-humoral level - by the effect of the sleep hormone, melatonine, produced by the neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Beside the biological factors, social interactions are also considered as important regulators of the biological clock systems. The pacemaker centers of the SCN receive efferents from the serotoninergic raphe nuclei in order to regulate stress responses and neuroimmunological functions. The direction and the level of the chronobiological desynchronisation could be totally divergent in the case of the different affective disorders. Different chronobiological interventions are required therefore in the case of the advanced and delayed sleep disorders. Sleeping disorders are considered as the most recognised signs of the chronobiological desynchronisation in depression, but these symptoms are only the tip of the iceberg, since other chronobiological symptoms could be present due to the hidden physiological abnormalities. The serum melatonine profile is considered to be characteristic to age, gender and certain neuropsychiatric disorders. The natural and synthetic agonist of the melatonine receptors could be used as chronobiotics. The recenlty marketed agomelatine with a highly selective receptor binding profile (MT1 and MT2 agonism and 5HT2C antagonism) targets the desynchronised circadian rhytm in affective disorders and it has mainly antidepressive effect. Among the non-pharmacological chronobiological interventions, the different forms of the sleep deprivation, light and social rhytm therapies could offer alternative treatment options for the clinician.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)69-81
Number of pages13
JournalNeuropsychopharmacologia Hungarica
Volume11
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Fingerprint

Mood Disorders
Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
Depression
S 20098
Biological Clocks
Raphe Nuclei
Sleep Deprivation
Biological Factors
Interpersonal Relations
Psychiatry
Sleep
Hormones
Neurons
Light
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics
Serum
Research
Genes
Sleep Wake Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

A depresszió mint kronobiológiai betegség. / Kálmán, J.; Kálmán, Sára.

In: Neuropsychopharmacologia Hungarica, Vol. 11, No. 2, 2009, p. 69-81.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kálmán, J. ; Kálmán, Sára. / A depresszió mint kronobiológiai betegség. In: Neuropsychopharmacologia Hungarica. 2009 ; Vol. 11, No. 2. pp. 69-81.
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