Dendritic cell subtypes as primary targets of vaccines: The emerging role and cross-talk of pattern recognition receptors

Sz. Benkő, Zoltán Magyarics, Attila Szabó, E. Rajnavolgyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Preventive vaccination is the most successful approach against infectious diseases and has a great impact on world health. Vaccines operate through the activation of innate immunity that helps to stimulate antigen-specific T- and B-lymphocytes. These events are orchestrated by dendritic cells (DCs) that are able to sample foreign structures and concomitantly sense 'danger signals'. Thus, DCs provide a functional link between innate and acquired immunity, and due to their regulatory potential are referred to as natural adjuvants. Human conventional and plasmacytoid DCs express different sets of well-characterized Toll-like membrane receptors (TLRs) that recognize a broad range of conserved molecular patterns of pathogens. The recently discovered cytosolic Nod-like receptors (NLRs) and RIG-like helicases (RLHs) also turned out to participate in pathogen recognition and modulation of immune responses through interacting signaling pathways. As a result of their collaboration, the TLR, NLR and RLH recognition systems induce the secretion of different combinations of cytokines that play a fundamental role in T-cell activation and instruction. Ligands of the innate recognition systems emerge as new adjuvants for vaccine design, whereas manipulation of the signaling pathways mediated by these receptors offers new avenues for fine tuning immune responses and optimizing immunotherapies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)469-485
Number of pages17
JournalBiological Chemistry
Volume389
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2008

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Pattern Recognition Receptors
Dendritic Cells
Vaccines
Toll-Like Receptors
Pathogens
Innate Immunity
Chemical activation
Membranes
T-cells
Lymphocytes
Viral Tumor Antigens
Adaptive Immunity
Immunotherapy
Communicable Diseases
Vaccination
B-Lymphocytes
Tuning
Modulation
Health
Cytokines

Keywords

  • Cross-priming
  • Cytokines
  • Immunomodulation
  • Innate immunity
  • Signaling
  • T-cell polarization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Dendritic cell subtypes as primary targets of vaccines : The emerging role and cross-talk of pattern recognition receptors. / Benkő, Sz.; Magyarics, Zoltán; Szabó, Attila; Rajnavolgyi, E.

In: Biological Chemistry, Vol. 389, No. 5, 01.05.2008, p. 469-485.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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