Decomposition and reforming of formic acid on supported Au catalysts: Production of CO-free H2

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Abstract

The vapor-phase decomposition of formic acid was studied over Au supported on various materials, with the aim of producing CO-free H2. With regards to the decomposition and H2 formation, Au/SiO2 was found to be the most active catalyst. The reaction started at 373 K and was complete at 523 K. Depending on the nature of the supports, significant differences were experienced in the reaction pathways. On Au deposited on SiO2, CeO2, and carbon Norit, dehydrogenation predominated, whereas on Al2O3, ZSM-5, and TiO 2-supported Au, dehydration of formic acid was favored. Pure CO-free H2 was obtained on Au/SiO2 and Au/CeO2 at and below 473 K. No changes in activity or selectivity were observed within ∼10 h. For most of the catalysts, the selectivity was improved by the addition of water to formic acid. In situ infrared spectroscopic studies revealed the formation of formate species even on Au/SiO2, located exclusively on Au particles. The decomposition of HCOOH over Au/SiO2 followed zero-order kinetics. The activation energy for the decomposition was 60.7 kJ mol-1, and that for H2 production was 58.5 kJ mol -1.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15459-15466
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry C
Volume115
Issue number31
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 11 2011

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formic acid
Formic acid
Carbon Monoxide
Reforming reactions
Catalyst supports
Decomposition
decomposition
catalysts
selectivity
Catalysts
Catalyst selectivity
Charcoal
formates
Dehydrogenation
dehydrogenation
Dehydration
dehydration
Carbon
Activation energy
Vapors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Energy(all)

Cite this

Decomposition and reforming of formic acid on supported Au catalysts : Production of CO-free H2. / Gazsi, A.; Bánsági, T.; Solymosi, F.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry C, Vol. 115, No. 31, 11.08.2011, p. 15459-15466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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