Cysticercosis of the fourth ventricle causing sudden death: A case report and review of the literature

T. Hortobágyi, Ali Alhakim, Olaf Biedrzycki, Vesna Djurovic, Jeewan Rawal, Safa Al-Sarraj

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A 15 years old girl of African origin was admitted with a history of headaches and a generalised tonic seizure. Her clinical examination including fundoscopy was normal. She claimed she had been assaulted. Within a few hours of her admission she was found dead in her bed during the ward round. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was unsuccessful. At post-mortem, the major organs showed no pathological changes and neck dissection showed no abnormality. Neuropathological examination after formalin fixation revealed a cystic lesion in the fourth ventricle, ependymitis and acute hydrocephalus. Histology showed parts of the parasite Taenia solium and the diagnosis was neurocysticercosis. This case highlights the need for forensic and general pathologists as well as forensic medical examiners and paediatricians to be aware of neurocysticercosis as a possible cause of sudden death in the presence of normal clinical findings and negative autopsy, especially in patients from Asian, African or South American countries. As cysticercosis is the commonest cause of seizures in the developing world, neurocysticercosis needs to be considered as a cause of sudden and unexpected death in any patient with a history of headaches and/or seizures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-146
Number of pages4
JournalPathology and Oncology Research
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2009

Fingerprint

Fourth Ventricle
Cysticercosis
Sudden Death
Neurocysticercosis
Seizures
Headache
Taenia solium
Coroners and Medical Examiners
Neck Dissection
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Hydrocephalus
Formaldehyde
Cause of Death
Autopsy
Histology
Parasites

Keywords

  • Cysticercosis
  • Neurocysticercosis
  • Sudden death
  • Taenia solium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

Cysticercosis of the fourth ventricle causing sudden death : A case report and review of the literature. / Hortobágyi, T.; Alhakim, Ali; Biedrzycki, Olaf; Djurovic, Vesna; Rawal, Jeewan; Al-Sarraj, Safa.

In: Pathology and Oncology Research, Vol. 15, No. 1, 03.2009, p. 143-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hortobágyi, T. ; Alhakim, Ali ; Biedrzycki, Olaf ; Djurovic, Vesna ; Rawal, Jeewan ; Al-Sarraj, Safa. / Cysticercosis of the fourth ventricle causing sudden death : A case report and review of the literature. In: Pathology and Oncology Research. 2009 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 143-146.
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