Cylindrospermopsin inhibits growth and modulates protease activity in the aquatic plants Lemna minor L. and Wolffia arrhiza (L.) Horkel

Katalin Jámbrik, C. Máthé, G. Vasas, I. Bácsi, G. Surányi, S. Gonda, G. Borbély, Márta M.-Hamvas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The toxic effects of cylindrospermopsin (cyanobacterial toxin) on animals have been examined extensively, but little research has focused on their effects on plants. In this study cylindrospermopsin (CYN) caused alterations of growth, soluble protein content and protease enzyme activity were studied on two aquatic plants Lemna minor and Wolffia arrhiza in short-term (5 days) experiments. For the treatments we used CYN containing crude extracts of Aphanizomenon ovalisporum (BGSD-423) and purified CYN as well. The maximal inhibitory effects on fresh weight of L. minor and W. arrhiza caused by crude extract were 60% and 54%, respectively, while the maximum inhibitory effects were 30% and 43% in the case of purified CYN at 20 μg ml-1 CYN content of culture medium. In CYN-treated plants the concentration of soluble protein showed mild increases, especially in W. arrhiza. Protease isoenzyme activity gels showed significant alterations of enzyme activities under the influence of CYN. Several isoenzymes were far more active and new ones appeared in CYN-treated plants. Treatments with cyanobacterial crude extract caused stronger effects than the purified cyanobacterial toxins used in equivalent CYN concentrations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)77-94
Number of pages18
JournalActa biologica Hungarica
Volume61
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2010

Keywords

  • Aphanizomenon ovalisporum
  • Lemna minor
  • Wolffia arrhiza
  • cylindrospermopsin
  • protease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Neurology

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