Culturing of avian embryos for time-lapse imaging

Paul A. Rupp, Brenda J. Rongish, A. Czirók, Charles D. Little

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Monitoring morphogenetic processes, at high resolution over time, has been a longstanding goal of many developmental cell biologists. It is critical to image cells in their natural environment whenever possible; however, imaging many warm-blooded vertebrates, especially mammals, is problematic. At early stages of development, birds are ideal for imaging, since the avian body plan is very similar to that of mammals. We have devised a culturing technique that allows for the acquisition of high-resolution differential interference contrast and epifluorescence images of developing avian embryos in a 4-D (3-D + time) system. The resulting information, from intact embryos, is derived from an area encompassing several millimeters, at micrometer resolution for up to 30 h.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)274-278
Number of pages5
JournalBioTechniques
Volume34
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2003

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Time-Lapse Imaging
Mammals
Embryonic Structures
Imaging techniques
Process monitoring
Birds
Vertebrates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Rupp, P. A., Rongish, B. J., Czirók, A., & Little, C. D. (2003). Culturing of avian embryos for time-lapse imaging. BioTechniques, 34(2), 274-278.

Culturing of avian embryos for time-lapse imaging. / Rupp, Paul A.; Rongish, Brenda J.; Czirók, A.; Little, Charles D.

In: BioTechniques, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.02.2003, p. 274-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rupp, PA, Rongish, BJ, Czirók, A & Little, CD 2003, 'Culturing of avian embryos for time-lapse imaging', BioTechniques, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 274-278.
Rupp PA, Rongish BJ, Czirók A, Little CD. Culturing of avian embryos for time-lapse imaging. BioTechniques. 2003 Feb 1;34(2):274-278.
Rupp, Paul A. ; Rongish, Brenda J. ; Czirók, A. ; Little, Charles D. / Culturing of avian embryos for time-lapse imaging. In: BioTechniques. 2003 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 274-278.
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