Cultural Transition

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A unique field experience of cultural and socioeconomic transition has taken place in Central Eastern European (CEE) countries during the past several decades. Until the end of the 1970s, the mortality rates in CEE countries were relatively good compared to Western European figures. Subsequently, whereas in Western Europe life expectancy rose continuously, in CEE countries this tendency was reversed. The sudden transition of society continuously created situations in which the psychological and physiological balance could be maintained only with great difficulty; thus, there was a need for a change in attitudes and ways of coping. The weakening of social cohesion and social capital are significant factors in the emergence of large social differences and the associated deterioration of health in these countries. Among all of the existing hypotheses chronic stress theory could be the most fruitful explanation of the mental and physical health consequences of cultural and social transformation in modern societies. The previously fixed order and communal forms of passing on values has changed. Now persons rarely receive the continuity of patterns and values with which they can identify themselves. Under the conditions of continous cultural and socioeconomic transition, the loss of balance in the human-environment system has become more apparent. Consequently, in all developed countries the number of adults and children suffering from anxiety and depressive symptoms has increased. An anxious human being can be used for necessary functions of society and can be arbitrarily changed and manipulated. We can arrive at the psychological definition of freedom and democracy through understanding the essence of anxiety. In a psychological sense, freedom means possessing the necessary, essential information needed to evaluate, solve, and control our situation, and being able to contribute actively to shaping our situation. Democracy means the right and the responsibility of information and action. Cultural transition in modern societies opens the way for behaviors on both the individual and the societal level as well: bringing democracy into being or arousing anxiety by withholding information from others. © 2007

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEncyclopedia of Stress
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages678-682
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9780123739476
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Democracy
Anxiety
Psychology
Life Expectancy
Developed Countries
Mental Health
Depression
Mortality
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Kopp, M. (2010). Cultural Transition. In Encyclopedia of Stress (pp. 678-682). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-012373947-6.00107-0

Cultural Transition. / Kopp, M.

Encyclopedia of Stress. Elsevier Inc., 2010. p. 678-682.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kopp, M 2010, Cultural Transition. in Encyclopedia of Stress. Elsevier Inc., pp. 678-682. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-012373947-6.00107-0
Kopp M. Cultural Transition. In Encyclopedia of Stress. Elsevier Inc. 2010. p. 678-682 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-012373947-6.00107-0
Kopp, M. / Cultural Transition. Encyclopedia of Stress. Elsevier Inc., 2010. pp. 678-682
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