Cross-cultural parent-child relations: The role of parental monitoring in youth's substance abuse behaviors in hungary and the United States

B. Pikó, Kevin M. Fitzpatrick

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Adolescence is an important development time when there is a significant restructuring in youth's social networks and support systems. A number of studies emphasize the negative role that peer groups play in determining youth's substance use, while still other studies find that youth substance use can be mediated by parental attitudes, family connectedness and monitoring. The main goal of the present study is to explore some of these associations in two different cultural settings. Data were collected among middle and high school students (ages 11-20 years) in Southern Hungary (N = 1240) and students (ages 10-19) living in a mid-sized urban area in Central Alabama, U.S. (N = 1525). The self-administered questionnaires were identical in both places and contained items that asked youth about their substance use (smoking, drinking, illicit drug use), and the parental/family influences in their life such as parental monitoring and parental attitudes towards substance use. Using multiple regression analyses in both samples, results suggest that parental monitoring (e.g., when parents know where their children are) is an important protective factor regardless of culture. Likewise, being beaten by a parent is an important universal risk factor. However, some differences may also be detected, e.g., parental attitudes towards substance use is an important influence only among Hungarian youth, while family structure is a significant predictor of substance use among US adolescents.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSubstance Abuse Among Adolescents and Adults
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages23-44
Number of pages22
ISBN (Print)9781611229332
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Hungary
substance abuse
parents
monitoring
peer group
family structure
Hungarian
adolescence
drug use
social support
smoking
restructuring
social network
urban area
student
adolescent
regression
questionnaire
school

Keywords

  • Cross-cultural comparison
  • Parental attitudes
  • Parental monitoring
  • Youth substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Pikó, B., & Fitzpatrick, K. M. (2011). Cross-cultural parent-child relations: The role of parental monitoring in youth's substance abuse behaviors in hungary and the United States. In Substance Abuse Among Adolescents and Adults (pp. 23-44). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

Cross-cultural parent-child relations : The role of parental monitoring in youth's substance abuse behaviors in hungary and the United States. / Pikó, B.; Fitzpatrick, Kevin M.

Substance Abuse Among Adolescents and Adults. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2011. p. 23-44.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Pikó, B & Fitzpatrick, KM 2011, Cross-cultural parent-child relations: The role of parental monitoring in youth's substance abuse behaviors in hungary and the United States. in Substance Abuse Among Adolescents and Adults. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 23-44.
Pikó B, Fitzpatrick KM. Cross-cultural parent-child relations: The role of parental monitoring in youth's substance abuse behaviors in hungary and the United States. In Substance Abuse Among Adolescents and Adults. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2011. p. 23-44
Pikó, B. ; Fitzpatrick, Kevin M. / Cross-cultural parent-child relations : The role of parental monitoring in youth's substance abuse behaviors in hungary and the United States. Substance Abuse Among Adolescents and Adults. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2011. pp. 23-44
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