Critical Appraisal of DNA Microarrays in Psychiatric Genomics

K. Mirnics, Pat Levitt, David A. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

107 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Transcriptome profiling using DNA microarrays are data-driven approaches with the potential to uncover unanticipated relationships between gene expression alterations and psychiatric disorders. Studies to date have yielded both convergent and divergent findings. Differences may be explained, at least in part, by the use of a variety of microarray platforms and analytical approaches. Consistent findings across studies suggest, however, that important relationships may exist between altered gene expression and genetic susceptibility to psychiatric disorders. For example, GAD67, RGS4, DTNBP1, NRG1, and GABRAB2 show expression alterations in the postmortem brain of subjects with schizophrenia, and these genes have been also implicated as putative, heritable schizophrenia susceptibility genes. Thus, we propose that for some genes, altered expression in the postmortem human brain may have a dual origin: polymorphisms in the candidate genes themselves or upstream genetic-environmental factors that converge to alter their expression level. We hypothesize that certain gene products, which function as "molecular hubs," commonly show altered expression in psychiatric disorders and confer genetic susceptibility for one or more diseases. Microarray gene expression studies are ideally suited to reveal these putative disease-associated molecular hubs and to identify promising candidates for genetic association studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)163-176
Number of pages14
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume60
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 15 2006

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Genomics
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Psychiatry
Gene Expression
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genes
Schizophrenia
Brain
Genetic Association Studies
Gene Expression Profiling

Keywords

  • DNA microarray
  • gene expression
  • human brain
  • psychiatric disorders
  • transcriptome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Critical Appraisal of DNA Microarrays in Psychiatric Genomics. / Mirnics, K.; Levitt, Pat; Lewis, David A.

In: Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 60, No. 2, 15.07.2006, p. 163-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mirnics, K. ; Levitt, Pat ; Lewis, David A. / Critical Appraisal of DNA Microarrays in Psychiatric Genomics. In: Biological Psychiatry. 2006 ; Vol. 60, No. 2. pp. 163-176.
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