Crinophagy mechanisms and its potential role in human health and disease

Tamás Csizmadia, Gábor Juhász

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Autophagic-lysosomal degradation is essential for the maintenance of normal homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Several types of such self-degradative and recycling pathways have been identified. From these, probably the least known autophagic process is crinophagy, during which unnecessary or obsolete secretory granules directly fuse with late endosomes/lysosomes as a means of rapid elimination of unused secretory material from the cytoplasm. This process was identified in 1966, but we are only beginning to understand the molecular mechanisms and regulation of crinophagy. In this review, we summarize the current examination methods and possible model systems, discuss the recently identified factors that are required for crinophagy, and give an overview of the potential medical relevance of this process.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science
PublisherElsevier B.V.
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Publication series

NameProgress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science
ISSN (Print)1877-1173
ISSN (Electronic)1878-0814

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Keywords

  • Acute pancreatitis
  • Diabetes
  • Drosophila salivary gland
  • Lysosome
  • Secretory granule

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Csizmadia, T., & Juhász, G. (Accepted/In press). Crinophagy mechanisms and its potential role in human health and disease. In Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science (Progress in Molecular Biology and Translational Science). Elsevier B.V.. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.pmbts.2020.02.002