Cost-Effectiveness of Organ Donation: Evaluating Investment into Donor Action and Other Donor Initiatives

James F. Whiting, Bryce Kiberd, Z. Kaló, Paul Keown, Leo Roels, Maria Kierulf

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Initiatives aimed at increasing organ donation can be considered health care interventions, and will compete with other health care interventions for limited resources. We have developed a model capable of calculating the cost-utility of organ donor initiatives and applied it to Donor Action, a successful international program designed to optimize donor practices. The perspective of the payer in the Canadian health care system was chosen. A Markov model was developed to estimate the net present value incremental lifetime direct medical costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) as a consequence of increased kidney transplantation rates. Cost-saving and cost-effectiveness thresholds were calculated. The effects of changing the success rate and time frame of the intervention was examined as a sensitivity analysis. Transplantation results in a gain of 1.99 QALYs and a cost savings of Can$104 000 over the 20-year time frame compared with waiting on dialysis. Implementation of an intervention such as Donor Action, which produced as few as three extra donors per million population, would be cost-effective at a cost of Can$ 1.0 million per million population. The cost-effectiveness of Donor Action and other organ donor initiatives compare favorably to other health care interventions. Organ donation may be underfunded in North America.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)569-573
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2004

Fingerprint

Tissue and Organ Procurement
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Tissue Donors
Costs and Cost Analysis
Delivery of Health Care
Quality-Adjusted Life Years
Cost Savings
North America
Kidney Transplantation
Population
Dialysis
Transplantation

Keywords

  • Cost-effectiveness
  • Organ donor
  • Renal transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Cost-Effectiveness of Organ Donation : Evaluating Investment into Donor Action and Other Donor Initiatives. / Whiting, James F.; Kiberd, Bryce; Kaló, Z.; Keown, Paul; Roels, Leo; Kierulf, Maria.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 4, No. 4, 04.2004, p. 569-573.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whiting, James F. ; Kiberd, Bryce ; Kaló, Z. ; Keown, Paul ; Roels, Leo ; Kierulf, Maria. / Cost-Effectiveness of Organ Donation : Evaluating Investment into Donor Action and Other Donor Initiatives. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2004 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 569-573.
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