Correlation of blood-spot 17-hydroxyprogesterone daily profiles and urinary steroid profiles in congenital adrenal hyperplasia

É Erhardt, J. Sólyom, J. Homoki, S. Juricskay, Gy Soltész

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To compare the value of blood-spot 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) daily profiles and urinary steroid excretion in untreated and treated patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Patients: Ten patients with CAH were investigated during steroid replacement therapy (Group 1), and 11 patients were investigated without treatment (Group 2). Methods: Capillary blood samples were collected for measurement of blood-spot 17-OHP values by non-chromatographic radioimmunoassay. Steroid profiles of 24-h urine samples were analyzed by gas chromatography. Results: There was a close correlation between the individual daily means of blood-spot 17-OHP measurements and the pregnanetriol/tetrahydrocortisone ratio in both groups of patients (Group 2: r=0.839, p<0.001, Group 1: r=0.686, p<0.001). Almost the same correlation was found between the blood-spot 17-OHP value and the sum of three 17-hydroxyprogesterone metabolites/the sum of three cortisol/cortisone metabolites ratio (Group 2: r=0.918, p<0.001; Group 1: r=0.741, p<0.001). Conclusions: Blood-spot 17-OHP measurements and 24-h urinary steroid profile have the same impact in identification and monitoring therapy of children with CAH.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-210
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2000

Keywords

  • 24-h urinary steroid profile
  • Blood-spot 17- hydroxyprogesterone
  • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia
  • Monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Endocrinology

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