Cooperative strategies and genome cybernetics in formation of complex bacterial patterns

Eshel Ben-Jacob, Ofer Shochet, Inon Cohen, Adam Tenenbaum, A. Czirók, T. Vicsek

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We present a study of interfacial pattern formation during growth of bacterial colonies. Growth of bacterial colonies bears similarities but presents an inherent additional level of complexity in comparison with non-living systems. In the former case, the building blocks themselves are living systems, each with its own autonomous self-interest and internal degrees of freedom. The bacteria have developed sophisticated communication channels, which they utilize when growth conditions are tough. Here we present a non-local communicating walkers model to study the effect of local bacterium-bacterium interaction and communication via chemotaxis signaling. We demonstrate how communication enables the colony to develop complex patterns in response to adverse growth conditions. This self-organization of the colony, which can be achieved only via cooperative behavior of the bacteria, may be viewed as the outcome of an interplay between the micro-level (the individual bacterium) and the macro-level (the colony). Some qualitative features of the complex morphologies can be accounted for by invoking ideas from pattern formation in non-living systems together with a simplified model of chemotactic 'feedback'.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMaterials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings
PublisherMaterials Research Society
Pages405-415
Number of pages11
Volume367
Publication statusPublished - 1995
EventProceedings of the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting - Boston, MA, USA
Duration: Nov 28 1994Dec 2 1994

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting
CityBoston, MA, USA
Period11/28/9412/2/94

Fingerprint

Cybernetics
Bacteria
Genes
Communication
Macros
Feedback

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials

Cite this

Ben-Jacob, E., Shochet, O., Cohen, I., Tenenbaum, A., Czirók, A., & Vicsek, T. (1995). Cooperative strategies and genome cybernetics in formation of complex bacterial patterns. In Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings (Vol. 367, pp. 405-415). Materials Research Society.

Cooperative strategies and genome cybernetics in formation of complex bacterial patterns. / Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Shochet, Ofer; Cohen, Inon; Tenenbaum, Adam; Czirók, A.; Vicsek, T.

Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. Vol. 367 Materials Research Society, 1995. p. 405-415.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ben-Jacob, E, Shochet, O, Cohen, I, Tenenbaum, A, Czirók, A & Vicsek, T 1995, Cooperative strategies and genome cybernetics in formation of complex bacterial patterns. in Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. vol. 367, Materials Research Society, pp. 405-415, Proceedings of the 1994 MRS Fall Meeting, Boston, MA, USA, 11/28/94.
Ben-Jacob E, Shochet O, Cohen I, Tenenbaum A, Czirók A, Vicsek T. Cooperative strategies and genome cybernetics in formation of complex bacterial patterns. In Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. Vol. 367. Materials Research Society. 1995. p. 405-415
Ben-Jacob, Eshel ; Shochet, Ofer ; Cohen, Inon ; Tenenbaum, Adam ; Czirók, A. ; Vicsek, T. / Cooperative strategies and genome cybernetics in formation of complex bacterial patterns. Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings. Vol. 367 Materials Research Society, 1995. pp. 405-415
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