Cooperation between BAT and WAT of rats in thermogenesis in response to cold, and the mechanism of glycogen accumulation in BAT during reacclimation

Peter B. Jakus, Attila Sandor, Tamas Janaky, Viktoria Farkas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rats were exposed to cold and then reacclimated at neutral temperature. Changes related to fatty acid and glucose metabolism in brown and white adipose tissues (BAT and WAT) and in muscle were then examined. Of the many proteins involved in the metabolic response, two lipogenic enzymes, acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) and ATP-citrate lyase, were found to play a pervasive role and studied in detail. Expression of the total and phosphorylated forms of both lipogenic enzymes in response to cold increased in BAT but decreased in WAT. Importantly, in BAT, only the phosphorylation of the ACC1 isoenzyme was enhanced, whereas that of ACC2 remained unchanged. The activities of these enzymes and the in vivo rate of FFA synthesis together suggested that WAT supplies BAT with FFA and glucose by decreasing its own synthetic activity. Furthermore, cold increased the glucose uptake of BAT by stimulating the expression of components of the insulin signaling cascade, as observed by the enhanced expression and phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3. In muscle, these changes were observed only during reacclimation, when serum insulin also increased. Such changes may be responsible for the extreme glycogen accumulation in the BAT of rats reacclimated from cold.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)332-339
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Lipid Research
Volume49
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1 2008

Keywords

  • Brown adipose tissue
  • Insulin signaling
  • Lipogenic enzymes
  • Phosphorylation
  • White adipose tissue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Cell Biology

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