Contribution made by the maize variety Mindszentpusztai Yellow Dent (MYD) to the birth of hybrid maize in Hungary and in Europe as a whole Review

G. Hadi, L. Márton, T. Szundy, I. Kovács, J. Pintér, B. Dolinka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The gene pool available for maize breeding is restricted. The heterosis sources used successfully over the last 80 years (Lancaster, Reid Yellow Dent) have been over-exploited and are near exhaustion (Duvick and Cassman 1999). Among the European sources of heterosis, European Flint is widely known, but its earliness and special suitability for silage maize breeding do not allow it to make any great contribution to further improvements in the yield potential of mid-season or late-maturing maize hybrids. In addition to developing new heterosis sources, the utilisation of older but little known sources could be a useful way of supplementing widely used sources. Over the last 50-60 years at least 29 inbred lines with commercial value have been developed from the Rumai group of the Central European Dent race and at least 19 from Mindszentpusztai Yellow Dent. Lines of Rumai and Mindszentpusztai Yellow Dent are at least as important in the European Corn Belt as lines originating from Lancaster Surecrop and Reid Yellow Dent are in the North American Corn Belt. In addition the first maize hybrid registered in Europe, Mv 5, was developed in Hungary, was a double cross involving three MYD lines. The paper provides a review of the contribution made by Mindszentpusztai Yellow Dent to Hungarian hybrid maize breeding during a period of over 50 years.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-166
Number of pages8
JournalCereal Research Communications
Volume32
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Hungary
Zea mays
Corn Belt region
heterosis
Parturition
corn
Hybrid Vigor
breeding
Breeding
corn silage
inbred lines
early development
Gene Pool
Silage

Keywords

  • Heterosis sources
  • Maize breeding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science

Cite this

Contribution made by the maize variety Mindszentpusztai Yellow Dent (MYD) to the birth of hybrid maize in Hungary and in Europe as a whole Review. / Hadi, G.; Márton, L.; Szundy, T.; Kovács, I.; Pintér, J.; Dolinka, B.

In: Cereal Research Communications, Vol. 32, No. 1, 2004, p. 159-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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