Contact formation in SiC devices

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In SiC devices designed for high temperature and high power applications, both ohmic and Schottky contacts are required which are stable at high temperature. The microstructure of contacts is very important to learn. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful method to reveal the microstructure of the contacts. Various contacts to SiC were investigated by TEM in cross-section and are discussed. TiN, Ni and Ni2Si are ohmic contacts to n-type SiC, while multilayers and WNx contacts are used for Schottky purposes. Magnetron sputtered TiN layers were deposited at 700 °C onto cubic and hexagonal SiC as well. The contacts are ohmic, single crystalline, epitaxial, non-reactive and stable at high temperature. Ni contacts evaporated onto hexagonal SiC and subsequently annealed at 950 °C showed ohmic behavior, but Ni reacted with SiC. The reaction resulted in the formation of nickel silicide together with the formation of high number of voids. Deposition and annealing of Si/Ni multilayer contacts resulted in a void-free Ni2Si contact layer preserving low contact resistivity. For Schottky purposes, multilayered contacts of Ti/Pt/Au/Ti can be used up to 575 °C, while WNx contacts are rectifying at least up to 800 °C.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-294
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Surface Science
Volume184
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 12 2001

Fingerprint

electric contacts
Ohmic contacts
Multilayers
Transmission electron microscopy
voids
Microstructure
Temperature
transmission electron microscopy
microstructure
Nickel
Annealing
preserving
Crystalline materials
nickel
electrical resistivity
annealing
cross sections
nickel silicide

Keywords

  • Contacts
  • Electron microscopy
  • SiC
  • Solid phase reactions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Contact formation in SiC devices. / Pécz, B.

In: Applied Surface Science, Vol. 184, No. 1-4, 12.12.2001, p. 287-294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pécz, B. / Contact formation in SiC devices. In: Applied Surface Science. 2001 ; Vol. 184, No. 1-4. pp. 287-294.
@article{63aed721feed4863892a6575c1629d1b,
title = "Contact formation in SiC devices",
abstract = "In SiC devices designed for high temperature and high power applications, both ohmic and Schottky contacts are required which are stable at high temperature. The microstructure of contacts is very important to learn. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful method to reveal the microstructure of the contacts. Various contacts to SiC were investigated by TEM in cross-section and are discussed. TiN, Ni and Ni2Si are ohmic contacts to n-type SiC, while multilayers and WNx contacts are used for Schottky purposes. Magnetron sputtered TiN layers were deposited at 700 °C onto cubic and hexagonal SiC as well. The contacts are ohmic, single crystalline, epitaxial, non-reactive and stable at high temperature. Ni contacts evaporated onto hexagonal SiC and subsequently annealed at 950 °C showed ohmic behavior, but Ni reacted with SiC. The reaction resulted in the formation of nickel silicide together with the formation of high number of voids. Deposition and annealing of Si/Ni multilayer contacts resulted in a void-free Ni2Si contact layer preserving low contact resistivity. For Schottky purposes, multilayered contacts of Ti/Pt/Au/Ti can be used up to 575 °C, while WNx contacts are rectifying at least up to 800 °C.",
keywords = "Contacts, Electron microscopy, SiC, Solid phase reactions",
author = "B. P{\'e}cz",
year = "2001",
month = "12",
day = "12",
doi = "10.1016/S0169-4332(01)00678-X",
language = "English",
volume = "184",
pages = "287--294",
journal = "Applied Surface Science",
issn = "0169-4332",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1-4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Contact formation in SiC devices

AU - Pécz, B.

PY - 2001/12/12

Y1 - 2001/12/12

N2 - In SiC devices designed for high temperature and high power applications, both ohmic and Schottky contacts are required which are stable at high temperature. The microstructure of contacts is very important to learn. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful method to reveal the microstructure of the contacts. Various contacts to SiC were investigated by TEM in cross-section and are discussed. TiN, Ni and Ni2Si are ohmic contacts to n-type SiC, while multilayers and WNx contacts are used for Schottky purposes. Magnetron sputtered TiN layers were deposited at 700 °C onto cubic and hexagonal SiC as well. The contacts are ohmic, single crystalline, epitaxial, non-reactive and stable at high temperature. Ni contacts evaporated onto hexagonal SiC and subsequently annealed at 950 °C showed ohmic behavior, but Ni reacted with SiC. The reaction resulted in the formation of nickel silicide together with the formation of high number of voids. Deposition and annealing of Si/Ni multilayer contacts resulted in a void-free Ni2Si contact layer preserving low contact resistivity. For Schottky purposes, multilayered contacts of Ti/Pt/Au/Ti can be used up to 575 °C, while WNx contacts are rectifying at least up to 800 °C.

AB - In SiC devices designed for high temperature and high power applications, both ohmic and Schottky contacts are required which are stable at high temperature. The microstructure of contacts is very important to learn. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a powerful method to reveal the microstructure of the contacts. Various contacts to SiC were investigated by TEM in cross-section and are discussed. TiN, Ni and Ni2Si are ohmic contacts to n-type SiC, while multilayers and WNx contacts are used for Schottky purposes. Magnetron sputtered TiN layers were deposited at 700 °C onto cubic and hexagonal SiC as well. The contacts are ohmic, single crystalline, epitaxial, non-reactive and stable at high temperature. Ni contacts evaporated onto hexagonal SiC and subsequently annealed at 950 °C showed ohmic behavior, but Ni reacted with SiC. The reaction resulted in the formation of nickel silicide together with the formation of high number of voids. Deposition and annealing of Si/Ni multilayer contacts resulted in a void-free Ni2Si contact layer preserving low contact resistivity. For Schottky purposes, multilayered contacts of Ti/Pt/Au/Ti can be used up to 575 °C, while WNx contacts are rectifying at least up to 800 °C.

KW - Contacts

KW - Electron microscopy

KW - SiC

KW - Solid phase reactions

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035852239&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035852239&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0169-4332(01)00678-X

DO - 10.1016/S0169-4332(01)00678-X

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0035852239

VL - 184

SP - 287

EP - 294

JO - Applied Surface Science

JF - Applied Surface Science

SN - 0169-4332

IS - 1-4

ER -