Constructing life-tables for the invasive maize pest Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Col.; Chrysomelidae) in Europe

S. Toepfer, U. Kuhlmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, Col.; Chrysomelidae) is an alien invasive species in Europe. It is a univoltine species with eggs that overwinter in the soil and larvae that hatch in spring. Three larval instars feed on maize roots, which can cause plant lodging and yield loss of economic importance. Adults emerge between mid-June and early August and can reduce yields through intensive silk feeding. In order to provide a thorough understanding of the population dynamics of this invasive pest species in the invaded European region, complete age specific life-tables were constructed in two maize fields in southern Hungary assessing the significance of natural mortality factors acting on D. v. virgifera populations. This information provides a rational basis for devising sustainable integrated pest management programmes, in particular, by enabling the identification of vulnerable pest age intervals for the timely application of various management tools. The life-table for D. v. virgifera in Europe resulted in a total mortality of about 99% from the egg stage in the autumn to the emergence of adult females in the following year (KTotal = 2.48), which is comparable with North America. The highest reduction of D. v. virgifera numbers resulted from the mortality in first instar larvae (94% marginal death rate) and from the unrealized fecundity (80%). However, only the variation in mortality between years can change the generational mortality and thus influence population growth. High variation in the marginal death rate between fields and years was found in the second and third instar larval stages, and in the overwintering egg stage. These mortality factors therefore have the potential to cause changes in the total generational mortality. Furthermore, the life-table suggested that a high fecundity could compensate for a high generational mortality and would lead to population increase.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-205
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Entomology
Volume130
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006

Fingerprint

Diabrotica virgifera virgifera
life tables
Chrysomelidae
pests
corn
instars
population growth
fecundity
larvae
lodging
integrated pest management
silk
Hungary
overwintering
invasive species
eclosion
population dynamics
autumn

Keywords

  • Marginal death rate
  • Natural mortality factors
  • Population dynamics
  • Western corn rootworm

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

Constructing life-tables for the invasive maize pest Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Col.; Chrysomelidae) in Europe. / Toepfer, S.; Kuhlmann, U.

In: Journal of Applied Entomology, Vol. 130, No. 4, 05.2006, p. 193-205.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3b33ba1f348b4e45b829a44015ede5c8,
title = "Constructing life-tables for the invasive maize pest Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Col.; Chrysomelidae) in Europe",
abstract = "The western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, Col.; Chrysomelidae) is an alien invasive species in Europe. It is a univoltine species with eggs that overwinter in the soil and larvae that hatch in spring. Three larval instars feed on maize roots, which can cause plant lodging and yield loss of economic importance. Adults emerge between mid-June and early August and can reduce yields through intensive silk feeding. In order to provide a thorough understanding of the population dynamics of this invasive pest species in the invaded European region, complete age specific life-tables were constructed in two maize fields in southern Hungary assessing the significance of natural mortality factors acting on D. v. virgifera populations. This information provides a rational basis for devising sustainable integrated pest management programmes, in particular, by enabling the identification of vulnerable pest age intervals for the timely application of various management tools. The life-table for D. v. virgifera in Europe resulted in a total mortality of about 99{\%} from the egg stage in the autumn to the emergence of adult females in the following year (KTotal = 2.48), which is comparable with North America. The highest reduction of D. v. virgifera numbers resulted from the mortality in first instar larvae (94{\%} marginal death rate) and from the unrealized fecundity (80{\%}). However, only the variation in mortality between years can change the generational mortality and thus influence population growth. High variation in the marginal death rate between fields and years was found in the second and third instar larval stages, and in the overwintering egg stage. These mortality factors therefore have the potential to cause changes in the total generational mortality. Furthermore, the life-table suggested that a high fecundity could compensate for a high generational mortality and would lead to population increase.",
keywords = "Marginal death rate, Natural mortality factors, Population dynamics, Western corn rootworm",
author = "S. Toepfer and U. Kuhlmann",
year = "2006",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1111/j.1439-0418.2006.01060.x",
language = "English",
volume = "130",
pages = "193--205",
journal = "Journal of Applied Entomology",
issn = "0931-2048",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Constructing life-tables for the invasive maize pest Diabrotica virgifera virgifera (Col.; Chrysomelidae) in Europe

AU - Toepfer, S.

AU - Kuhlmann, U.

PY - 2006/5

Y1 - 2006/5

N2 - The western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, Col.; Chrysomelidae) is an alien invasive species in Europe. It is a univoltine species with eggs that overwinter in the soil and larvae that hatch in spring. Three larval instars feed on maize roots, which can cause plant lodging and yield loss of economic importance. Adults emerge between mid-June and early August and can reduce yields through intensive silk feeding. In order to provide a thorough understanding of the population dynamics of this invasive pest species in the invaded European region, complete age specific life-tables were constructed in two maize fields in southern Hungary assessing the significance of natural mortality factors acting on D. v. virgifera populations. This information provides a rational basis for devising sustainable integrated pest management programmes, in particular, by enabling the identification of vulnerable pest age intervals for the timely application of various management tools. The life-table for D. v. virgifera in Europe resulted in a total mortality of about 99% from the egg stage in the autumn to the emergence of adult females in the following year (KTotal = 2.48), which is comparable with North America. The highest reduction of D. v. virgifera numbers resulted from the mortality in first instar larvae (94% marginal death rate) and from the unrealized fecundity (80%). However, only the variation in mortality between years can change the generational mortality and thus influence population growth. High variation in the marginal death rate between fields and years was found in the second and third instar larval stages, and in the overwintering egg stage. These mortality factors therefore have the potential to cause changes in the total generational mortality. Furthermore, the life-table suggested that a high fecundity could compensate for a high generational mortality and would lead to population increase.

AB - The western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, Col.; Chrysomelidae) is an alien invasive species in Europe. It is a univoltine species with eggs that overwinter in the soil and larvae that hatch in spring. Three larval instars feed on maize roots, which can cause plant lodging and yield loss of economic importance. Adults emerge between mid-June and early August and can reduce yields through intensive silk feeding. In order to provide a thorough understanding of the population dynamics of this invasive pest species in the invaded European region, complete age specific life-tables were constructed in two maize fields in southern Hungary assessing the significance of natural mortality factors acting on D. v. virgifera populations. This information provides a rational basis for devising sustainable integrated pest management programmes, in particular, by enabling the identification of vulnerable pest age intervals for the timely application of various management tools. The life-table for D. v. virgifera in Europe resulted in a total mortality of about 99% from the egg stage in the autumn to the emergence of adult females in the following year (KTotal = 2.48), which is comparable with North America. The highest reduction of D. v. virgifera numbers resulted from the mortality in first instar larvae (94% marginal death rate) and from the unrealized fecundity (80%). However, only the variation in mortality between years can change the generational mortality and thus influence population growth. High variation in the marginal death rate between fields and years was found in the second and third instar larval stages, and in the overwintering egg stage. These mortality factors therefore have the potential to cause changes in the total generational mortality. Furthermore, the life-table suggested that a high fecundity could compensate for a high generational mortality and would lead to population increase.

KW - Marginal death rate

KW - Natural mortality factors

KW - Population dynamics

KW - Western corn rootworm

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33646476313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33646476313&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1439-0418.2006.01060.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1439-0418.2006.01060.x

M3 - Article

VL - 130

SP - 193

EP - 205

JO - Journal of Applied Entomology

JF - Journal of Applied Entomology

SN - 0931-2048

IS - 4

ER -