Congenital lung malformations in the second trimester: Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis and pathologic findings

Ágnes Harmath, Ákos Csaba, Erik Hauzman, J. Hajdú, Barbara Pete, Z. Papp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To correlate prenatal sonographic diagnosis of cystic lung malformations with fetopathologic findings after termination of pregnancy. Methods. We retrospectively analyzed the data of 16 terminated cases in which a cystic lung lesion was diagnosed pre- or postnatally. Results. On average, prenatal diagnosis was established on the 21st gestational week (range, 19-26 weeks). The cause of termination was severe polyhydramnios in 4 cases, nonimmune fetal hydrops in 4 cases, other congenital malformation in 5 cases (renal malformation, 2 cases; congenital diaphragmatic hernia, 3 cases), and obstetrical conditions (intrauterine death, placental abruption, spontaneous abortion) in 3 cases. In 11 cases, congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) was the presumptive prenatal diagnosis. Autopsy confirmed the prenatal diagnosis in 6 of them, while in the other 5 cases, an enteric cyst, a laryngeal atresia, an unidentified tumor, a pulmonary hypoplasia, and an extralobar pulmonary sequestration were found on histologic examination. On the other hand, the autopsy revealed CCAM in those 5 cases in which other malformations were suggested prenatally. Conclusion. The prenatal sonographic diagnosis of CCAM is difficult. Our cases emphasize the important role of fetopathology even today in the verification of prenatal diagnosis based on sonographic examinations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)250-255
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Ultrasound
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2007

Fingerprint

Second Pregnancy Trimester
Prenatal Diagnosis
lungs
Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation of Lung
Lung
autopsies
Autopsy
examination
Bronchopulmonary Sequestration
Polyhydramnios
Abruptio Placentae
Hydrops Fetalis
cysts
pregnancy
Spontaneous Abortion
death
lesions
Cysts
tumors
Kidney

Keywords

  • Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation
  • Cystic lung disease
  • Genetic counseling
  • Pathological findings
  • Prenatal diagnosis
  • Ultrasonography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Congenital lung malformations in the second trimester : Prenatal ultrasound diagnosis and pathologic findings. / Harmath, Ágnes; Csaba, Ákos; Hauzman, Erik; Hajdú, J.; Pete, Barbara; Papp, Z.

In: Journal of Clinical Ultrasound, Vol. 35, No. 5, 06.2007, p. 250-255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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