Cone differentiation with no photopigment coexpression

Z. Szepessy, A. Lukats, T. Fekete, A. Barsi, P. Röhlich, A. Szél

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To decide whether the transitory coexpression of cone visual pigments described in the developing rat and gerbil retina is a universal feature of dichromatic mammalian species. METHODS. The rabbit, a species widely used in eye research, was selected for the study and a search made for the presence of cones that bound more than one cone antibody during the first postnatal week. To plot the densities of individual cone types and to colocalize the two visual pigments, immunocytochemistry on retinal wholemounts and consecutive tangential sections, respectively, were used. Results. The sequence in which the visual pigments began to be expressed was the same as that observed in other mammals: first, rhodopsin; second, blue pigment; and last, green pigment. The striking increase in blue cone density numbers observed in the rat, however, did not occur in the rabbit. Instead, some days after the first blue cones appeared, the green cones also started to express their visual pigment, and this cone type soon outnumbered the blue cones. Within the limits of the immunocytochemical method, it was established that unlike the developing rat, the presence of double-labeled cones was not a character of the rabbit retina. Conclusions. Visual pigment coexpression is an interesting phenomenon of retinal development, however, it is not the exclusive scenario of photoreceptor differentiation. Each species must be carefully studied before deciding whether its retinal cones synthesize both pigments during retinal development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3171-3175
Number of pages5
JournalInvestigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science
Volume41
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Retinal Pigments
Rabbits
Retina
Retinal Cone Photoreceptor Cells
Rhodopsin
Gerbillinae
Mammals
Immunohistochemistry
Antibodies
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Cone differentiation with no photopigment coexpression. / Szepessy, Z.; Lukats, A.; Fekete, T.; Barsi, A.; Röhlich, P.; Szél, A.

In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Vol. 41, No. 10, 2000, p. 3171-3175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Szepessy, Z, Lukats, A, Fekete, T, Barsi, A, Röhlich, P & Szél, A 2000, 'Cone differentiation with no photopigment coexpression', Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol. 41, no. 10, pp. 3171-3175.
Szepessy, Z. ; Lukats, A. ; Fekete, T. ; Barsi, A. ; Röhlich, P. ; Szél, A. / Cone differentiation with no photopigment coexpression. In: Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science. 2000 ; Vol. 41, No. 10. pp. 3171-3175.
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