Concordant phylogeography and cryptic speciation in two Western Palaearctic oak gall parasitoid species complexes

James A. Nicholls, Sonja Preuss, Alexander Hayward, G. Melika, G. Csóka, José Luis Nieves-Aldrey, Richard R. Askew, Majid Tavakoli, Karsten SchÖnrogge, Graham N. Stone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Little is known about the evolutionary history of most complex multi-trophic insect communities. Widespread species from different trophic levels might evolve in parallel, showing similar spatial patterns and either congruent temporal patterns (Contemporary Host-tracking) or later divergence in higher trophic levels (Delayed Host-tracking). Alternatively, host shifts by natural enemies among communities centred on different host resources could disrupt any common community phylogeographic pattern. We examined these alternative models using two Megastigmus parasitoid morphospecies associated with oak cynipid galls sampled throughout their Western Palaearctic distributions. Based on existing host cynipid data, a parallel evolution model predicts that eastern regions of the Western Palaearctic should contain ancestral populations with range expansions across Europe about 1.6 million years ago and deeper species-level divergence at both 8-9 and 4-5 million years ago. Sequence data from mitochondrial cytochrome b and multiple nuclear genes showed similar phylogenetic patterns and revealed cryptic genetic species within both morphospecies, indicating greater diversity in these communities than previously thought. Phylogeographic divergence was apparent in most cryptic species between relatively stable, diverse, putatively ancestral populations in Asia Minor and the Middle East, and genetically depauperate, rapidly expanding populations in Europe, paralleling patterns in host gallwasp species. Mitochondrial and nuclear data also suggested that Europe may have been colonized multiple times from eastern source populations since the late Miocene. Temporal patterns of lineage divergence were congruent within and across trophic levels, supporting the Contemporary Host-tracking Hypothesis for community evolution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)592-609
Number of pages18
JournalMolecular Ecology
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

Fingerprint

Phylogeography
gall
phylogeography
species complex
galls
parasitoid
Quercus
divergence
trophic level
Population
Cytochromes b
Middle East
Megastigmus
Insects
parallel evolution
History
range expansion
insect communities
natural enemy
cytochrome

Keywords

  • Community evolution
  • Comparative phylogeography
  • Cryptic species
  • Host-tracking
  • Megastigmus
  • Oak gall

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics

Cite this

Concordant phylogeography and cryptic speciation in two Western Palaearctic oak gall parasitoid species complexes. / Nicholls, James A.; Preuss, Sonja; Hayward, Alexander; Melika, G.; Csóka, G.; Nieves-Aldrey, José Luis; Askew, Richard R.; Tavakoli, Majid; SchÖnrogge, Karsten; Stone, Graham N.

In: Molecular Ecology, Vol. 19, No. 3, 02.2010, p. 592-609.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nicholls, JA, Preuss, S, Hayward, A, Melika, G, Csóka, G, Nieves-Aldrey, JL, Askew, RR, Tavakoli, M, SchÖnrogge, K & Stone, GN 2010, 'Concordant phylogeography and cryptic speciation in two Western Palaearctic oak gall parasitoid species complexes', Molecular Ecology, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 592-609. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-294X.2009.04499.x
Nicholls, James A. ; Preuss, Sonja ; Hayward, Alexander ; Melika, G. ; Csóka, G. ; Nieves-Aldrey, José Luis ; Askew, Richard R. ; Tavakoli, Majid ; SchÖnrogge, Karsten ; Stone, Graham N. / Concordant phylogeography and cryptic speciation in two Western Palaearctic oak gall parasitoid species complexes. In: Molecular Ecology. 2010 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 592-609.
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